Bulletin on courses of study

2017-18

B.Tech. & Dual Degree Programmes

Department of Civil Engineering,         IIT Bombay



 

Bulletin on courses of study

2017-18

Contents

Civil Engineering Department at IIT Bombay. 3

B.Tech. and Dual Degree Programmes. 3

Coursework requirements for B.Tech. Students. 4

Coursework requirements for Dual Degree Students. 4

Minor courses for B.Tech. Students. 4

B.Tech. in Civil Engineering. 5

Course Structure - First Year. 5

Course Details for First Year. 6

Course Structure - Second Year. 20

Course Details for Second Year. 21

Course Structure - Third Year. 36

Course Structure (B. Tech.) - Fourth Year. 51

List of Departmental Electives. 52

Dual Degree (B.Tech. + M.Tech.) In Civil Engineering. 81

CE-1: Transportation Engineering. 81

Course Structure - Fourth Year. 81

Course Structure – Fifth Year. 87

List of CE-1 PG Electives. 88

CE-2: Geotechnical Engineering. 100

Course Structure – Fourth Year. 100

Course Structure – Fifth Year. 102

List of CE-2 PG Electives. 103

CE-3: Water Resources Engineering. 118

Course Structure – Fourth Year. 118

Course Structure – Fifth Year. 121

CE-4: Dual Degree in Structural Engineering. 130

Course structure – Fourth Year. 130

Course structure – Fifth year. 134

List of CE-4: PG Electives. 134

CE-5: Dual Degree in Ocean Engineering. 142

Course structure – Fourth year. 142

Course structure – Fifth year. 147

List of CE-5 PG Electives. 147

CE-6: Dual Degree in Remote Sensing. 151

Course structure – Fourth Year. 151

Course Structure – Fifth Year. 155

List of CE-6 PG Electives. 156

Minor in Civil Engineering.. 165


 

Civil Engineering Department at IIT Bombay

The Department of Civil Engineering has been a part of IIT Bombay since its inception in 1958. Over the years, the department has grown tremendously, and is now recognized as one of the best and major engineering departments in the country and ranked highly in the World for Civil Engineering. With its multifaceted faculty, it provides high quality teaching and instruction at both UG and PG as well as Ph. D levels. Besides, the Department is actively involved in basic and applied research and consultancy and provides high quality technical advisory support through various R & D projects and consultancy to various organizations. Civil Engineering Department continues to maintain and cultivate its strong links with the public sector companies, planning agencies, public service providers, consultation firms, construction industry, academic and research institutions both within and outside the country.

The department has attracted significant amount of sponsored research funding from government and private agencies and is delivering excellent output in terms of implementable solutions and large number of research publication in quality journals having high impact factor. The Department disseminates the knowledge gained from its high quality research through training programs and interacts with world renowned personalities through workshops and conferences. The students and faculty have won prestigious national and international awards and recognition, and continuing to bring laurels to the department and the Institute.

For more information visit    http://www.civil.iitb.ac.in

B.Tech. and Dual Degree Programmes

The Department of Civil Engineering admits 117 students in undergraduate programme. The department offers dual-degree programmes in the following six areas of specialization.

1.       Transportation Systems Engineering

2.       Geotechnical Engineering

3.       Water Resources Engineering

4.       Structural Engineering

5.       Ocean Engineering

6.       Remote Sensing[1]

The department has well-equipped laboratories with excellent advanced instrumentation and equipment for research and teaching. State-of-art computational facilities are available in the departmental computational laboratory which is equipped with new servers, workstations and personal computers. All the computers in the department are networked with the institute Local Area Network and are connected to internet through IIT Bombay’s proxy servers.

The students of the Department can use the Central Library that has more than 440,000 books and volumes, and subscribes more than 1800 current journals in Science, Engineering, Humanities and Social Sciences. Library cataloguing is fully computerized. The Department also has a library where all B. Tech., M. Tech. and Ph.D. Theses completed at the Department are available for reference. The Department has 52 faculty members and about 25 other technical and non-technical staff. The department disseminates knowledge to working professionals regularly by organizing national and international conferences and workshops. Continuing Education Programme courses are also conducted by the Department on a regular basis. The faculty publishes extensively from the research and consultancy work carried out in the Department. More than 200 research papers are published every year by the faculty in all areas of Civil Engineering in the national and international journals and conferences.

The rules and regulations pertaining to B.Tech and Dual Degree Programme at IIT Bombay can be found at: http://www.iitb.ac.in/newacadhome/rules/btechrulesnew08.pdf

Coursework requirements for B.Tech. Students

The B.Tech. Programme involves four full years of coursework that should be completed by the student to earn required credits to graduate. The minimum credit requirement for the student to graduate from Civil Engineering is 275 credits. The students can also pursue honors stream which require an additional 24 credits to be earned by the student. Students can also complete a B.Tech degree with minor if they pursue an additional 30 credits with other departments.

Coursework requirements for Dual Degree Students

The B.Tech. Programme involves five full years of coursework that should be completed by the student to earn required credits to graduate. The minimum credit requirement for the student to graduate from Civil Engineering is 395 credits.

Minor courses for B.Tech. Students

A basket of four courses are offered to students desiring to pursue a minor in Civil Engineering at undergraduate level. These courses are open to B.Tech students from other departments desiring to pursue a minor in Civil Engineering


B.Tech. in Civil Engineering

Course Structure - First Year

First Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

MA 105

Calculus

3

1

0

8

 

PH 107

Quantum Physics and application

2

1

0

6

 

CH 105

Organic/Inorganic Chemistry

2

0

0

4

 

CH 107

Physical Chemistry

2

0

0

4

 

CS 101 or BB101

Computer Programming & Utilization

2

0

2

6

 

Biology

ME 113

Workshop Practice

0

0

4

4

 

PH 117 or               CH 117

Physics Lab

0

0

3

3

 

Chemistry Lab

Total Credits

35

 

 

Second Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

MA 106

Linear Algebra

2

0

0

4

 

MA 108

Differential Equations-I

2

0

0

4

 

PH 108

Basics of Electricity and Magnetism

2

1

0

6

 

CS 101 or       BB 101

Computer Programming & Utilization

2

0

2

6

 

Biology

ME 119

Engineering Graphics &Drawing

0

1

3

5

 

PH 117 or       CH 117

Physics Lab

0

0

3

3

 

Chemistry Lab

CE 102

Engineering Mechanics

3

0

0

6

 

Total Credits

34

 

Course Details for First Year

 

MA-105 Calculus

 

Review of limits, continuity, and differentiability. Mean value theorem, Taylors Theorem, Maxima and Minima. Riemann integrals, Fundamental theorem of Calculus, Improper integrals, applications to area, volume. Convergence of sequences and series, power series. Partial Derivatives, gradient and directional derivatives, chain rule, maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Double and Triple integration, Jacobians and change of variables formula. Parametrization of curves and surfaces, vector Fields, line and surface integrals. Divergence and curl, Theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes.

 

References:

1.       Hughes-Hallett et al., Calculus - Single and Multivariable (3rd Edition), John-Wiley and Sons (2003).

2.       James Stewart, Calculus (5th Edition), Thomson (2003).

3.       T. M. Apostol, Calculus, Volumes 1 and 2 (2nd Edition), Wiley Eastern 1980

4.       G. B. Thomas and R. L. Finney, Calculus and Analytic Geometry (9th Edition), ISE Reprint, Addison-Wesley, 1998.

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PH-107 Quantum Physics and application

 

Quantum nature of light: Photoelectric Effect and Compton Effect. Stability of atoms and Bohr`s rules. Wave particle duality: De Broglie wavelength, Group and Phase velocity, Uncertainty Principle, Double Slit Experiment. Schrodinger Equation. Physical interpretation of Wave Function, Elementary Idea of Operators, Eigen-value Problem. Solution of Schrodinger equation for simple boundary value problems. Reflection and Transmission Coefficients. Tunneling. Particle in a three dimensional box, Degenerate states. Exposure to Harmonic Oscillator and Hydrogen Atom without deriving the general solution. Quantum Statistics: Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose Einstein and Fermi Dirac Statistics by detailed balance arguments. Density of states. Applications of B-E statistics: Lasers. Bose-Einstein Condensation. Applications of F-D statistics: Free electron model of electrons in metals. Concept of Fermi Energy. Elementary Ideas of Band Theory of Solids. Exposure to Semiconductors, Superconductors, Quantum Computing

References:

1.       R. Eisberg and R. Resnick, Quantum Physics: John Wiley 2002, 2nd Edition.

2.       F. K. Richtmyer, E. H. Kennard and J.N. Cooper, Introduction to Modern Physics, Tata McGraw Hill 1976, 6th Edition.

3.       K. S. Krane, Modern Physics: John Wiley 1998, 2nd Edition.

4.       Mani and Mehta, Introduction to Modern Physics: East-West Press Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi 2000.

5.       S. H. Patil, Elements of Modern Physics: Tata McGraw Hill, 1984.

6.       A Beiser, Concepts of Modern Physics, Tata McGraw Hill, 2009.

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CH-105 Organic and Inorganic Chemistry

 

Molecular orbitals of common functional groups, Qualitative Huckel MOs of conjugated polyenes and benzene. Aromaticity. Configuration, molecular chirality and isomerism, Conformation of alkanes and cycloalkanes, Reactivity of carbonyl group), Functional group interconversions involving oxidation and reduction, Periodic properties: trends in size, electron affinity, ionization potential and electronegativity, Use of Ellingham diagram and thermodynamics in the extraction of elements, Transition metal chemistry: inorganic complexes, bonding theories, magnetism, bonding aspects and structural distortion, Bioinorganic chemistry: storage and transport proteins, Catalysis: hydrogenation, hydroformylation and olefin metathesis.

References:

1.       P. Volhardt and N. Schore, Organic Chemistry: Structure and Function, 5th Edition, W. H Freeman & Co, 2006

2.       T. W. G. Solomons, C. B. Fryhle, Organic Chemistry, 9th Edition, WilelyIndia Pvt. Ltd., 2009

3.       R. T. Morrison and R. N. Boyd, Organic Chemistry, 6th edition, Pearson Com., 1992

4.       L. G. Wade, Organic Chemistry, Pearson Education 6th edition, 2006.

5.       M. J. Sienko and R. A. Plane, Chemical Principles and Applications, McGraw Hill, 1980.

6.       J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 4th Edition, ELBS, 1991.

7.       D. D. Ebbing, General Chemistry, Houghton Miffin Co., 1984.

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CH-107 Physical Chemistry

 

Schrodinger equation, Origin of quantization, Born interpretation of wave function, Hydrogen atom: solution to part, Atomic orbitals, many electron atoms and spin orbitals. Chemical bonding: MO theory: LCAO molecular orbitals, Structure, bonding and energy levels of diatomic molecules. Concept of sp, sp2and sp3hybridization; Bonding and shape of many atom molecules; Intermolecular Forces; Potential energy surfaces-Rates of reactions; Steady state approximation and its applications; Concept of pre-equilibrium; Equilibrium and related thermodynamic quantities

References:

1.       P. Atkins and J. de Paula, Atkins302222 Physical Chemistry, Oxford University Press, 8th edition, 2006.

2.       I. N. Levine, Physical Chemistry, 5th edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2002.

3.       D. A. McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, Physical Chemistry - a molecular approach, Viva Books Pvt. Ltd. (1998).

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CS-101 Computer Programming and Utilization

 

This course provides an introduction to problem-solving with computers using a modern languages such as Java or C/C++. Topics covered will include: Utilization: Developer fundamentals such as editor, integrated programming environment, Unix shell, modules, libraries; Programming features: Machine representation, primitive types, arrays and records, objects, expressions, control statements, iteration, procedures, functions, and basic i/o;  Sample problems in engineering, science, text processing, and numerical methods.

References:

1.       Cohoon and Davidson , C++ Program Design: An introduction to Programming and Object-Oriented Design, 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill. 2003.

2.       Gary Bronson, A First Book of C++, 2nd Ed, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning

 

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BB-101 Biology

 

Quantitative views of modern biology. Importance of illustrations and building quantitative/qualitative models. Role of estimates. Cell size and shape. Temporal scales. Relative time in Biology. Key model systems - a glimpse. Management and transformation of energy in cells. Mathematical view - binding, gene expression and osmotic pressure as examples. Metabolism. Cell communication. Genetics. Eukaryotic genomes. Genetic basis of development. Evolution and diversity. Systems biology and illustrative examples of applications of Engineering in Biology.

References:

1.        R. Phillips, J. Kondev and J. Theriot., Physical Biology of the Cell. Garland science publishers. 2008. 1st edition.

2.       J.B.Reece, L.A.Urry, M.L.Cain, S.A.Wasserman, P.V.Minorsky, R.B.Jackson., Campbell Biology. Benjamin Cummings publishers. 2010. 9th edition.

 

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ME-113 Workshop Practice

 

Introduction to wood work: hand tools & various operations. Introduction to pattern making: types of patterns, allowances, colour coding. etc. Introduction to bench work & fitting: tools & operations. Introduction to metal cutting and machine tools: Safety measures, principles of operation of basic machine tools like lathe, shaping, &drilling. Important operations on these machines. Cutting tools and their usage, selection of cutting speeds, feeds, etc. Introduction to welding. Assignments: Simple assignments in wood working, fitting, electric arcwelding, lathe and shaping machine work.

References:

1.        Elements of Workshop Technology, Vol. I by S. K. Hajrachoudhury &Others, Media Promoters and Publishers, Mumbai. 14th Edition, 2007.

2.       Elements of Workshop Technology, Vol. II by S. K. Hajrachoudhury &Others, Media Promoters and Publishers, Mumbai. 12th Edition, 2007.

3.       Workshop Practice by H. S. Bawa, Tata-McGraw Hill, 2004.

 

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PH-117 Physics Lab

 

 

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CH-117 Chemistry Lab

 

Experiments illustrating the concepts of 1) galvanic cells, (2) thermochemistry, (3) chemical kinetics, (4) equilibrium constant, (5) analysis by oxidation reduction titration.

 

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MA-106 Linear Algebra

 

Vectors in Rn, notion of linear independence and dependence, linear span of a set of vectors, vector subspaces of Rn, basis of a vector subspace. Systems of linear equations, matrices and Gauss elimination, row space, null space, and column space, rank of a matrix. Determinants and rank of a matrix in terms of determinants. Abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, matrix of a linear trans- formation, change of basis and similarity, rank-nullity theorem. Inner pro duct spaces, Gram-Schmidt process, orthonormal bases, projections and least squares approximation. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, characteristic polynomials, eigenvalues of special matrices (orthogonal, unitary, Hermitian, symmetric, skew- symmetric, normal). Algebraic and geometric multiplicity, diagonalization by similarity transformations, spectral theorem for real symmetric matrices, application to quadratic forms.

References:

1.       H. Anton, Elementary linear algebra with applications (8th Edition), John Wiley (1995).

2.       G. Strang, Linear algebra and its applications (4th Edition), Thomson (2006).

3.       S. Kumaresan, Linear algebra - A Geometric approach, Prentice Hall of India (2000).

4.       E. Kreyszig, Advanced engineering mathematics (8th Edition), John Wiley (1999).

 

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MA-108 Differential Equations

 

Exact equations, integrating factors and Bernoulli equations. Orthogonal trajectories. Lipschitz condition, Picard’s theorem, examples on nonuniqueness. Linear differential equations generalities. Linear dependence and Wronskians. Dimensionality of space of solutions, Abel-Liouville formula. Linear ODEs with constant coefficients, the characteristic equations. Cauchy-Euler equations. Method of undetermined coefficients. Method of variation of parameters. Laplace transform generalities. Shifting theorems.

References:

1.       E. Kreyszig, Advanced engineering mathematics (8th Edition), John Wiley (1999).

2.       W. E. Boyce and R. DiPrima, Elementary Differential Equations (8th Edition), John Wiley (2005).

3.       T. M. Apostol, Calculus, Volume 2 (2nd Edition), Wiley Eastern, 1980.

 

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PH-108 Basics of Electricity and Magnetism

 

Review of vector calculus: Spherical polar and cylindrical coordinates; gradient, divergence and curl; Divergence and Stokes` theorems; Divergence and curl of electric field, Electric potential, properties of conductors; Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations, uniqueness theorems, boundary value problems, separation of variables, method of images, multipoles; Polarization and bound charges, Gauss` law in the presence of dielectrics, Electric displacement D and boundary conditions, linear dielectrics; Divergence and curl of magnetic field, Vector potential and its applications; Magnetization, bound currents, Ampere`s law in magnetic materials, Magnetic field H, boundary conditions, classification of magnetic materials; Faraday’s law in integral and differential forms, Motional emf, Energy in magnetic fields, Displacement current, Maxwell’s equations, Electromagnetic (EM) waves in vacuum and media, Energy and momentum of EM waves, Poynting`s theorem; Reflection and transmission of EM waves across linear media.

References:

1.       Introduction to Electrodynamics (3rd ed.), David J. Griffiths, Prentice Hall, 2011.

2.       Classical Electromagnetism, J. Franklin, Pearson Education, 2005.

 

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ME-119 Engineering Graphics and Drawing

 

Introduction to engineering drawing and orthographic projections; Projection of points and straight line; Projection of planes and solids; Projection of simple machine elements; Development of surfaces, Intersection of surfaces; Construction of isometric views from orthographic projections.

References:

1.       Bhatt N. D. and Panchal V. M., Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishers, Anand, 2007.

2.       Luzadder Warren J. and Duff Jon M., Fundamentals of Engineering Drawing, Prentice Hall of India, 2001.

3.       French Thomas E. and Vierck Charles J., Engineering Drawing and Graphic Technology, McGraw Hill, 1993.

4.       Jolhe Dhananjay A., Engineering Drawing, Tata McGraw Hill, 2007.

5.       Shah M. B. and Rana B. C., Engineering Drawing, Dorling Kindersley (India) Pvt. Ltd, Pearson Education,

 

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CE-102 Engineering Mechanics

 

Equivalent Force Systems: Basic concepts of force-couple systems. Planar force systems: parallel force systems; simplest equivalent for general force system- "wrench". Distributed force systems. Equations of Statics and its Applications: Simple frictionless rigid body assemblies; two force members: machines: trusses: cables: rigid body assemblies including friction. Virtual Work and Potential Energy Principles: Application of these principles as replacement of equations of statics for real life problems. Vibrations: Equations of motion for single degree-of-freedom systems and rigid body assemblies: free vibration (simple harmonic oscillator): concepts of damping and critical damping: damped free vibration: equations of motion for harmonic excitation: transient and steady-state vibrations: illustration of MDOF systems concepts with two degree-of-freedom systems.

References:

1.       I.H. Shames, "Introduction to Solid Mechanics, Second Edition, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 1989.

2.       F.P. Beer and Jhonston, "Mechanics for Engineers", McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1987,

 

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Course Structure - Second Year

First Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 221

Solid Mechanics

3

1

0

8

Core Course

CE 223

Fluid Mechanics

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 231

Solid Mechanics Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE233

Fluid Mechanics Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

EE 101

Introduction to Electrical and Electronics Circuits

3

1

0

8

MA 207

Differential Equations-II

2

0

0

4

HS 101

Economics

3

0

0

6

Total Credits

38

 

 

Second Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 204

Geodesy

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 228

Applied Hydraulic Engineering

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 216

Geodesy Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE 230

Hydraulic Engineering Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE 222

Structural Mechanics I

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 232

Building Materials and Construction

3

0

0

6

Core Course

ES 200

Environmental Studies: Science and Engineering

 

 

 

3

 

HS 200

Environmental Studies

 

 

 

3

 

Total Credits

36

 

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Course Details for Second Year

 

CE-221 Solid Mechanics - I

 

Rigid and deformable solids; Method of sections for evaluating internal forces in bodies - review of free body diagrams; Concept of stress - normal and shear stresses; State of stress; Concept of strain - normal and shear strains; State of strain; Hooke’s law; Constitutive relations; Axially loaded members, force and deflections; Indeterminate systems and compatibility conditions; Simple indeterminate systems and lack of fit problems; Generalized Hooke’s law; Stress in cylindrical and spherical shells; Torsion of circular shafts - determinate and simple indeterminate systems. Elastic theory of bending of beams; Shear force and bending moment diagrams; Bending and shearing stresses in beams of symmetrical cross-section; Concept of shear flow and shear center; Principle of superposition and its limitations. Transformation of plane stress and strain; Principal stresses and strains; Mohr’s circle. Bending deflection of beams by direct integration method; Application of direct integration method to simple indeterminate systems; Elastic buckling of compression members.

 

References:

1.       E.P. Popov, Engineering Mechanics of Solids, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hill, New Delhi, 1999.

2.       F.P. Beer, E.R. Johnston and J.T. DeWolf, Mechanics of Materials, 3rd Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2004.

3.       I.H. Shames and J.M. Pitarresi, Introduction to the Solid Mechanics, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hill, New Delhi, 1989.

4.       J.M. Gere, Mechanics of Materials, 5th Ed., Brooks/Cole, Chennai, 2001.

5.       S.H. Crandall, N.C. Dhal and T.J. Lardner, Mechanics of Solids: An Introduction, McGraw Hill, Tokyo, 1994.

6.       S.M.A. Kazimi, Solid Mechanics, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1981.

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CE-223 Fluid Mechanics - I

 

Fundamental Concepts of Fluid Flow: Fundamental definitions, Flow characteristics, Classification of fluids, Fluid properties, Foundations of flow analysis. Fluid Statics: Fluid pressure, Forces on solid surfaces, Buoyant forces. Kinematics of Fluid Flow: Equations for acceleration, Continuity equation, Irrotational and rotational flow, Potential and stream functions. Dynamics of Fluid Flow: Finite control volume analysis, Euler and Bernoulli’s theorems, Impulse momentum theory, Applications of energy and momentum equations. Laminar and Turbulent Flows: Types of flow, Reynolds experiment, Laminar flow between parallel plates, Laminar flow in pipes, Turbulent flow in pipes. Navier-Stokes Equations and Applications: Introduction to Navier-Stokes equations, Exact solutions for simple cases of flow, Plane Poiseuille flow, Coute flow, Stokes flow and porous media flow. Boundary Layer Theory and Applications: Concepts of boundary layer, Flow separation, Circulation, Drag and lift on immersed bodies.

References:

1.       V.L. Streeter and E.B. Wylie, Fluid Mechanics, McGraw Hill, 1998.

2.       Granger, R.A., Fluid Mechanics, CBS College Publishing, New York, 1985.

3.       J.F. Douglas, J.M. Gasiorek, and J.A. Swaffield, Fluid Mechanics, Addison-Wesley, Harlow 1999.

4.       I.H. Shames, Mechanics of Fluids, McGraw Hill, New York, 1992.

5.       R.L. Daugherthy, J.B. Franzini and E.J. Finnemore, Fluid Mechanics with Engineering Applications, McGraw Hill, New York, 1985.

6.       A.K. Jain, Fluid Mechanics, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 1998.

7.       L.P.N. Modi and S.M. Seth, Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics, Standard Book House, New Delhi, 2002

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CE-231 Solid Mechanics Lab - I

 

Tension test on mild steel and cast iron rods, impact test on metal, compression and shear test on Neoprene pad specimens, buckling of slender steel columns, torsion test on round mild steel and cast iron rods, indentation hardness test on metals. Measurement of strain by electrical resistance strain gauge (cantilever beam), evaluation of Poisson??s ratio on mild steel flat, deflection of simply supported, location of shear centre in a channel section, unsymmetrical bending. Compression test on plane concrete cube and cylinder, ultrasonic test on concrete cube.

References:

1.       H.E. Davis, G.E. Troxell and C.R. Litecky, Inspection and Testing of Engineering Materials, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill, New York, 1964.

2.       E.P. Popov, Introduction to Mechanics of Solids, Prentice Hill, New Delhi, 1973.

3.       American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), Annual Book of ASTM Standards, 2005.

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CE-233 Fluid Mechanics Lab - I

 

Study experiments: Ideal fluid motion past a two-dimensional circular cylinder by means of electrical analogues, Boundary layer growth analysis in a wind tunnel, Minor transition losses in pipes, friction factors in pipe, Flow measurements by orifices, venturimeter and notches, Bernoulli apparatus, Reynolds apparatus. Flow net studies around circular cylinder, Verification of Darcy’s law.

References:

1.       W.R. Lamox, Laboratory work in hydraulics, Granada Publishers, London, 1979.

2.       S. Narasimhan, Fluid Mechanics Laboratory: A Manual for Experiments, Curriculum Development Programme, IIT Bombay, 1982.

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EE-101 Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Circuits

 

Introduction, basic physical laws, circuit elements, KVL, KCL, and a few important circuit theorems, simple circuits, Transients in R-L, R-C, R-L-C, Sinusoidal Steady State, Real/Reactive Power, Three Phase, Working Principles of Transformers/AC/DC machines. Functional Characteristics of Diode, BJT, OP-AMP Analog circuit Examples: rectifiers, amplifiers, oscillators etc. Digital Circuits: AND/OR gates, Flip Flops, DAC/ADC etc.

References:

1.       Vincent Del Toro, `Electrical Engineering Fundamental, Prentice Hall, 1989

2.       K.A.Krishnamurthy and M.R.Raghuveer, `Electrical and Electronics Engineering for Scientists`, Wiley Eastern Ltd., 1993.

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MA-207 Differential Equations - II

 

Review of power series and series solutions of ODE??s. Legendre??s equation and Legendre polynomials. Regular and irregular singular points, method of Frobenius. Bessel’s equation and Bessel’s functions. Strum-Liouville problems. Fourier series. D’Alembert solution to the Wave equation. Classification of linear second order PDE in two variables. Laplace, Wave, and Heat equations using separation of variables. Vibration of a circular membrane. Heat equation in the half space.

References:

1.       E. Kreyszig, Advanced engineering mathematics (8th Edition), John Wiley (1999).

2.       W. E. Boyce and R. DiPrima, Elementary Differential Equations (8th Edition), John Wiley (2005).

3.       R. V. Churchill and J. W. Brown, Fourier series and boundary value problems (7th Edition), McGraw-Hill (2006).

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HS-101 Economics

 

Basic economic problems. Resource constraints and Welfare maximizations. Nature of Economics: Positive and normative economics; Micro and macroeconomics, Basic concepts in economics. The role of the State in economic activity; market and government failures; New Economic Policy in India. Theory of utility and consumer’s choice. Theories of demand, supply and market equilibrium. Theories of firm, production and costs. Market structures. Perfect and imperfect competition, oligopoly, monopoly. An overview of macroeconomics, measurement and determination of national income. Consumption, savings, and investments. Commercial and central banking. Relationship between money, output and prices. Inflation - causes, consequences and remedies. International trade, foreign exchange and balance payments, stabilization policies: Monetary, Fiscal and Exchange rate policies.

References:

1.       P. A. Samuelson & W. D. Nordhaus, Economics, McGraw Hill, NY, 1995.

2.       A. Koutsoyiannis, Modern Microeconomics, Macmillan, 1975.

3.       R. Pindyck and D. L. Rubinfeld, Microeconomics, Macmillan publishing company, NY, 1989.

4.       R. J. Gordon, Macroeconomics 4th edition, Little Brown and Co., Boston, 1987.

5.       William F. Shughart II, The Organization of Industry, Richard D. Irwin, Illinois, 1990.

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CE-204 Geodesy

 

Introduction to Plane & Geodetic Surveying, Fundamental Principles, Earth Ellipsoid, Geodetic Datums and Coordinate Systems, Control Surveys: Horizontal & Vertical: Triangulation, Traverse, Leveling, Instrumentation: Total Stations, EDMs, Digital Levels; Engineering Surveying, Data Processing, Legendre302222s Theorem, Theory of Errors and Adjustment Computations, Introduction to Space Geodetic Techniques: GPS, Introduction to Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing, Maps & Map-making.

References:

1.       W. Torge, Geodesy, 3rd Revised Ed., Walter de Gruyter, Berlin-New York, 2001.

2.       G. Bomford, Geodesy, 4th Ed., Oxford Press, London, 1994.

3.       B.C. Punmia, A.K. Jain and A.K. Jain, Surveying, Vol. 1 and II, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi, 1996.

4.       R.E. Davis, F.S. Foote and J.W. Kelly, Surveying: Theory and Practice, 7th Ed., McGraw Hill, New York, 1980.

5.       D.Clark, Plane and Geodetic Surveying, Vol. I and II, Constable and Company, London, 1980.

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CE-228 Applied Hydraulic Engineering

Dimensional Analysis, Model similitude, Model scales, Physical modeling, Computational hydraulics, Theory and applications. Momentum and energy equations, Correction factors, Specific energy, Specific force,Criticalflows; Uniform and non-uniform flows – properties, design of channels, Gradually varied flows– Theory and analysis, typical method of computation. Rapidly varied flows – flow over a spillway, hydraulic jump, control and stabilization, Unsteady flows – basic equations, uniformly progressive flow, flood waves, flood routing. Revisiting Major and minor losses; components of water distribution system; Multiple reservoir problem; Pipe network: Hardy-cross method; Unsteady flow in pipes: water hammer, Surge tank; Water distribution systems and analysis; Intakes, pumping and transportation of water; Appurtenances of water transport and distribution systems. Essentials of water supply; Water Demand and Quantity Estimation: Design period, population forecast; Domestic water standards; Sources of water and their yield; Water quality: definitions and characteristics, suspended solids, turbidity, alkalinity, hardness, fluoride, metals, Nutrients, BOD and COD; Processes of water treatment: Aeration, sedimentation and flocculation; Settling, coagulation, Softening, Filtration: slow and rapid sand filters; chlorination and other disinfecting methods

References:

1.       Vent te Chow (2009), “Open Channel Hydraulics”, McGraw-hill, New Delhi.

2.       K.G. Rangaraju (1993), Flow in Open Channels, Tata McGraw Hill Publication Co. Ltd., New Delhi.

3.       K. Subramanya (1992), Flow in Open Channels, Tata McGraw Hill Publication Co. Ltd.,New Delhi.

4.       R.H. French (1986), Open Channel Hydraulics, McGraw Hill Book Co., New York.

5.       Peavy, Rowe and Tchobanoglous, (2003), Environmental Engineering, McGraw-hill, New York. S.K.

6.       Garg, (2005) “Environmental Engineering 1: Water Supply Engineering”, Khanna Publisher, New Delhi.

7.       R. Srivastava (2010), “Flow through open channels”, Oxford University Press (2008)

8.       Jain A K, “Fluid Mechanics”, Khanna Publisher, New Delhi.

9.       M.J. Hammer, (1986), Water and Waste Water Technology, John Wiley and Sons, New York.

10.   CPHEEO: Manual on Water Supply and Treatment, Ministry of Urban Development, 1991.

11.   CPHEEO: Manual on Sewerage and Sewage Treatment, Ministry of Works and Housing, New Delhi, 1980.                                                                                   Back to course structure

CE-216 Geodesy Lab

 

Angular & Distance Observations with Digital Theodolites, EDMs and Total Stations, Triangulation & Traversing, Leveling, Surveying & Mapping using Global Positioning System.

References:

 

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CE-230 Hydraulic Design Lab

 

Seepage analysis - Heleshaw model; Infiltration experiment - Infiltrometer; Groundwater Flow model; Permeability studies; Hydraulic jump experiments; Channel expansion and contraction studies; Small surges and wave experiments; Flow measurements in open channels – Flow over a weir,  sharp and broad crested weirs, spillway; Boundary layer flows – wind tunnel; Hydrology – rainfall simulator, overland and channel flow experiments; Flow in pipes – Pipe network; Sedimentation and scour studies – settling tank, sedimentation flume, scour at structures

References:

1.       W.R. Lamox, Laboratory work in hydraulics, Granada Publishers, London, 1979.

2.       S. Narasimhan, Fluid Mechanics Laboratory – A Manual for Experiments, Curriculum Development Programme, IIT Bombay, 1982.

3.       V.T. Chow, Open Channel Hydraulics, McGraw Hill, London, 1975.

4.       V.L. Streeter and E.B. Wylie, Fluid Mechanics,  McGraw Hill, London, 1998.

 

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CE-222 Structural Mechanics - I

 

Analysis of Statically Determinate Structures - Determination of forces in trusses, frames, arches, and cables; Drawing bending moment, shear force and axial force diagrams; Computation of displacements using principle of virtual work; Moment-area method, Conjugate-beam method; Energy Principles; Maxwell’s and Betti’s laws; Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Structures - Concept of static indeterminacy; Concept of compatibility conditions; Method of consistent deformations for statically indeterminate trusses, beams, frames, arches; Matrix formulation of force method; Influence Lines - Concept of influence lines using equilibrium methods, and by using Muller Breslau principle for both statically determinate and indeterminate structures.

References:

1.       H.H. West, Fundamentals of Structural Analysis, Wiley, New York, 1993.

2.       C.H. Norris, J.B. Wilbur and S. Utku, Elementary Structural Analysis, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill International, Tokyo, 1976.

3.       C.S. Reddy, Basic Structural Analysis, 2nd Ed. Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1996.

4.       L.S. Negi and R.S. Jangid, Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1997.

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ES-200 Environmental Studies: Science and Engineering

 

 

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CE-232 Building Materials and Construction

 

Building Materials: Introduction, Structure and properties of materials - Stone, brick (Clay and Fly ash), Hollow blocks, Tiles, Steel, Cement concrete, Glass. (IS codes/ ASTM codes for assessing the Engineering property of materials and relevant test procedures will be discussed)                         

Building Construction: Building systems, Foundations, Masonry, Walls, Floors, Lintels and arches, Roofs, Formwork and scaffolding, Plastering and Pointing, Weather proofing, Construction Equipments

References:

1.       M. S. Mamlouk and J. P. Zaniewski, “Materials for Civil and Construction Engineers,” 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, USA, 2010.

2.       W. D. Callister, Jr., “Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction,” 3rd Ed., John Wiley and Sons, USA, 1994.

3.       P. C. Varghese, “Building Materials”, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., India, 2005.

4.       K. S. Jagadish, Alternative building materials technology, New Age International, India, 2007.

5.       B. C. Punmia, Building Construction, 5th Ed., Laxmi Publications, India, 1993.

6.       W. B. McKay, “Building Construction – Volumes 1 - 4,” 5th Edition, Orient Longman, UK, 1993.

7.       R. Chudley, “Construction Technology – Volumes 1 - 2,” 2nd Edition, Longman, UK, 1987.

8.       P. C. Varghese, “Building Construction”, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., India, 2007.

9.       P. Spence and E. Kultermann, “Construction Materials, Methods and Techniques: Building for a Sustainable Future”, 3rd Ed., Cengage Learning, USA, 2010.

 

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HS-200 Environmental Studies

 

 

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Course Structure - Third Year

First Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 323

Geotechnical Engineering I

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 325

Structural Design - I

2

0

2

6

Core Course

CE 310

Transportation Engineering I

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 317

Structural Mechanics II

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 329

Geotechnical Engineering Lab I

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE 328

Transportation Engineering Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

HS XXX

Humanities Elective - I

3

0

0

6

Humanities Elective

Total Credits

36

 

 

Second Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 330

Geotechnical Engineering II

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 332

Structural Design II

2

0

2

6

Core Course

CE 334

Transportation Engineering II

2

1

0

3

Core Course

CE 336

Geotechnical Engineering Lab II

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE 338

Estimation and Materials Testing Laboratory

0

0

3

3

Core Course

GS 318

Applied Geology for Civil Engineers

2

0

2

6

Core Course

Institute Elective I

 

 

 

6

 

Total Credits

36

 

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Humanities Electives offered in 3rd year 1st semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credits

HS 301

Philosophy

6

HS 303

Psychology

6

HS 305

Reading Literature

6

HS 307

Sociology

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

CE-323 Geotechnical Engineering I

 

Origin of Soils and Rocks; Rock cycle; Basic relationships; Index properties of aggregates; Soil structure; Soil classification; Soil compaction; laboratory compaction; factors affecting soil compaction; Field compaction; Soil-water statics; Effective stress; Capillarity phenomenon in soils; Flow through soils; Quick sand condition; Permeability and methods for its determination; Flownets; Stresses in soil from surface loads; Boussinesq theory; Newmarks chart, Contact pressures; Consolidation of soils; Settlement of compressible soil layers.

References:

1.       Terzaghi, K., Peck, R. B. &Mesri, G., “Soil Mechanics in Engineering Practice”, Wiley, 1996.

2.       Craig, R.F. “Craig’s Soil Mechanics”, 7th Ed., Spon Press, 2004.

3.       Holtz, R.D. & Kovacs, W.D., “An Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering”, Prentice Hall, 1981.

4.       Lambe, T.W. & Whitman, R.V., “Soil Mechanics”, John Wiley & Sons, 1979.

5.       Mitchell, J.K. & Soga, K., “Fundamentals of Soil Behaviour”, John Wiley & Sons, 2005.

6.       Ranjan, Gopal & Rao, A.S.R., “Basic and Applied Soil Mechanics”, New Age Int. Pvt. Ltd., 2004.

7.       Bolton, M.D. “A Guide to Soil Mechanics”, Universities Press, 2003.

8.       Das, B.M. “Principles of Geotechnical Engineering”, Thomson Books, 2006.

9.       Murthy, V. N. S. “Geotechnical Engineering: Principles and Practices of

10.    Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering”, CRC Press, 2002.

11.   Coduto, D.P. “Geotechnical Engineering: Principles and Practices”,

12.    Pearson Education, Prentice Hall, 2007.

13.   Goodman, R. E. “Introduction to Rock Mechanics” John Wiley & Sons, 1989.

 

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CE-325 Structural Design I

 

Location of structural members; Load calculations and preliminary design; Design studio; Computer analysis of buildings; Design and drawing for various structural members; Detailing.

References:

1.       P. Dayaratnam, Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures, 3rd Ed., Oxford-IBH Publications, New Delhi 1998.

2.       P.C. Varghese, Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design, Prentice Hall India, New Delhi, 2001.

 

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CE-310 Transportation Engineering I

 

Introduction to transportation systems engineering; Transportation system characteristics; Planning of highway, railway and airport systems; Highway/railway route selection; Airport site selection; Geometric design of highway, railway and airfield elements; Pavement/track materials and testing; Material characterization for design; Design of highway and airfield pavements; Structural design of the railway track; Highway construction, maintenance and rehabilitation.

References:

1.       C.S. Papacostas and P.D. Prevedouros,TransportationEngineering and Planning, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall,New Jersey, 2001.

2.       J.H. Banks, Introduction to Transportation Engineering, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2002.

3.       P.H. Wright and K. Dixon, Highway Engineering,th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2003.

4.       S.K. Khanna and C.E.G. Justo, Highway Engineering,Khanna Publishers, Roorkee, 2001.

5.       L.R. Kadiyali, Principles and Practice of Highway Engineering, Khanna Technical Publications, Delhi, 2000.

6.       Y.H. Huang, Pavement Analysis and Design, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2003.

7.       R. Horonjeff and F.X. Mckelvey, Planning andDesign of Airports, McGraw Hill,New York, 1994.

8.       S.C. Sexena and S.P. Arora, A Text Book ofRailway Engineering, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, New Delhi, 1998.

9.       W.W. Hay, Railroad Engineering,Wiley,New York, 1988.

 

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CE-317 Structural Mechanics II

 

Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Structures - Concept of kinematic indeterminacy; Degrees of freedom; Development of slope-deflection equations; Concept of relative stiffness; Moment distribution method and application to beams and simple frames; Matrix formulation of displacement methods - Stiffness matrix approach with reference to computer application; Generation of 1-dimensional frame element stiffness matrix, flexural, axial & shear deformations,. Torsional effects; Concept of local effects, generation of load vector, Effects of finite joints;. Application to plane frames, space frames, grid structures; Matrix formulation of force and displacement methods - Solution of simultaneous equations; Stiffness matrix approach with reference to computer application; Generation of 1-dimensional frame element stiffness matrix, flexibility and displacement approaches; Torsional effects; Concept of local effects, generation of load vector, Effects of finite joints; Application to plane frames, space frames, grid structures, Introduction to Finite Elements Method for 2-D plane problems..

References:

1.       W. Weaver and J.M. Gere, Matrix Analysis of Framed Structures, 3rd Ed., Von. Nastrand, New York, 1990.

2.       H.H. West, Fundamentals of Structural Analysis, Wiley, New York, 1993.

3.       C.S. Reddy, Basic Structural Analysis, 2nd Ed. Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1996.

4.       J.S. Przemieniecki, Theory of Matrix Structural Analysis, Dover, New York, 1968.

5.       G.S. Pandit and S.P. Gupta, Structural Analysis - A Matrix Approach, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi 1994.

6.       M.B. Kanchi, Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis, Wiley Eastern, New Delhi, 1993.

7.       L.S. Negi and R.S. Jangid, Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1997.

8.       S. Utku, C.H. Norris and J.B. Wilbur, Elementary Structural Analysis,3022404th Ed., McGraw Hill College, New York, 1990..

 

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CE-329 Geotechnical Engineering Lab I

 

Identification and processing of soils, Determination of moisture content of soils, Absorption test for rocks, Particle size distribution using sieve analysis and hydrometer analysis for soils, Specific gravity test, Atterberg limit tests for soils, Standard Proctor compaction test for soils, Field density measurements for soils, Permeability tests for soils.

References:

1.       B.M. Das, “Soil Mechanics Laboratory Manual”, 6th Ed., London, University Press, 2001.

2.       J.E. Bowles, “Physical Properties of Soils”, 2nd Ed., McGraw Hill International, Singapore, 1990.

3.       Ramamurthy, T. “Engineering in Rocks for Slopes, Foundation and

4.       Tunnels”, Prentice Hall India Pvt. Ltd., 2007..

 

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CE-328 Transportation Engineering Lab I

 

Laboratory testing of road aggregates, bituminous binders and mixes for their suitability in road construction with reference to IRC/BIS specifications. Sub grade evaluation - California bearing ratio, resilient modulus, modulus of sub grade reaction; Pavement evaluation studies - measurement of pavement distresses, deflection studies; Traffic studies.

References:

1.       S. K. Khanna and C.E.G Justo, Highway Material Testing (Laboratory Manual) Nem Chand & Bros, Roorkee.

2.       Relevant IRC/BIS/ASTM Specifications

3.       Relevant highway design software manual Relevant IRC/BIS/ASTM codes.

4.       R.P. Roess, E.S. Prassas and W.R. McShane, Traffic Engineering, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2004.

5.       Highway Capacity Manual, Transportation Research Board,National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000.

 

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HS-301 Philosophy

 

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HS-303 Psychology

 

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HS-305 Reading Literature

Reading of and reading into (interpreting) a variety of literary texts; analysing the art of literature; evaluation of the context(s) of reading and the reader-text relationship (s).

References:

1.       Meyer, Michale, ed. The Bedford Introduction of Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 6th edition, 2001.

2.       Kennedy, X.J., and Dana Goia, eds. Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Longman, 10th edition, 2006.

3.       Lawall, Sarah N. Ed. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. W W Norton & Company; 2nd expanded edition. Volumes A-F. 2003

 

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HS-307 Sociology

 

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CE-330 Geotechnical Engineering II

Surface and subsurface investigations; Boring, drilling and sampling; Field tests for soils and rocks (SPT, CPT, VST, PMT, DMT, DCPT, PLT); Sand drains; Shear strength of soils and rocks; Mohr circle of stress; Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion; Hoek and Brown failure criterion; Estimation of shear strength parameters for soil and rock; Stress paths; Theories of earth pressure and retaining walls; excavation; bracing system; stability of slopes; Earth and rock-fill dams

References:

1.       Terzaghi, K., Peck, R. B. & Mesri, G., “Soil Mechanics in Engineering Practice”, Wiley, 1996.

2.       Craig, R.F. “Craig’s Soil Mechanics”, 7th Ed., Spon Press, 2004.

3.       Holtz, R.D. & Kovacs, W.D., “An Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering”, Prentice Hall, 1981.

4.       Lambe, T.W. & Whitman, R.V., “Soil Mechanics”, John Wiley & Sons, 1979.

5.       Mitchell, J.K. & Soga, K., “Fundamentals of Soil Behaviour”, John Wiley & Sons, 2005.

6.       Ranjan, Gopal & Rao, A.S.R., “Basic and Applied Soil Mechanics”, New Age Int. Pvt. Ltd., 2004.

7.       Bolton, M.D. “A Guide to Soil Mechanics”, Universities Press, 2003.

8.       Das, B.M. “Principles of Geotechnical Engineering”, Thomson Books, 2006.

9.       Murthy, V. N. S. “Geotechnical Engineering: Principles and Practices of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering”, CRC Press, 2002.

10.   Coduto, D.P. “Geotechnical Engineering: Principles and Practices”, Pearson Education, Prentice Hall, 2007.

11.   Goodman, R. E. “Introduction to Rock Mechanics” John Wiley & Sons, 1989.

12.   Ramamurthy, T. “Engineering in Rocks for Slopes, Foundation and Tunnels”, Prentice Hall India Pvt. Ltd., 2007

 

 

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CE-332 Structural Design II

Design and drawing of built-up compression members; plate girder design, design and drawing of laced/buttened columns with base plate; moment resistant designs.

References:

1.       A.S. Arya and J.L. Ajmani, Design of Steel Structures, Nem Chand & Bros., Roorkee, 1990.

2.       S.M.A. Kazimi and R.S. Jindal, Design of Steel Structures, Prentice Hall (India), New Delhi,1981.

3.       S.K. Duggal, Design of Steel Structures, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1993

 

 

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CE-334 Transportation Engineering II

Traffic Operations: Traffic stream components and characteristics; Theories of traffic flow; Traffic studies; Design of control strategies for simple systems like intersections, roundabouts, freeways, etc.; Capacity and level of services of various transportation facilities. Transportation Planning: Introduction to urban and regional transportation planning; Urban transportation planning process; Introduction to urban transportation model system; Evaluation of Transportation Systems: Economic analysis; Environmental impact assessment; Financial analysis. Laboratory testing of sub grade soils, aggregates, bituminous binders and mixes for their suitability in road construction with reference to IRC/BIS specifications; Traffic studies; Pavement evaluation tests.

References:

1.       J.H. Banks, Introduction to Transportation Engineering, McGraw Hill, New York, 2002.

2.       C.S. Papacostas and P.D. Prevedouros, Transportation Engineering and Planning, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall,New Jersey, 2001.

3.       R.P. Roess, E.S. Prassas and W.R. McShane, Traffic Engineering, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2004.

4.       Highway Capacity Manual, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000.

5.       J.D. Ortuzar and L.G. Willumsen, Modelling Transport, 3rd Ed., Wiley, New York, 2002.

6.       M. Meyer and E.J. Miller, Urban Transportation Planning, 2nd Ed., McGraw Hill, New York, 2001

 

 

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CE-336 Geotechnical Engineering Lab II

Consolidation of soils, shear strength of soils and rocks, direct shear test of soils, UCC test on soils, Triaxial test - UU, CU type tests on soils, UCS & Triaxial test on rocks; Laboratory vane shear test for soils.

References:

1.       B.M. Das, “Soil Mechanics Laboratory Manual”, 6th Ed., London, University Press, 2001.

2.       J.E. Bowles, “Physical Properties of Soils”, 2nd Ed., McGraw HillInternational, Singapore, 1990.

3.       Ramamurthy, T. “Engineering in Rocks for Slopes, Foundation and Tunnels”, Prentice Hall India Pvt. Ltd., 2007

 

 

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CE-338 Estimation and Materials Testing Laboratory

Tension Test on Tor-Steel (IS 1786), Testing of Tiles (Wet Transverse strength, Water absorption test)(IS 1237), Testing of Bricks ( Compressive strength, Water Absorption, Efflorescence) (IS 3495- Part 1,2,3), Compression Test on Plain Concrete Cube & Cylinder  (IS 516), Ultrasonic Test on Concrete Cube (IS 13311 Part 1), Schmitz Rebound Hammer Test (NDT) on Concrete Cube (IS 13311 Part 2), Water Permeability Test for concrete ( IS  3085),  Consistency Test on Cement  (IS 4031 Part 4), Initial and Final setting time of Cement (IS 4031 Part 5), Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar Cube (IS 4031 Part 6), Effect of chemical admixtures on Fresh Concrete Properties (IS 9103, IS 1199, IS 8142), Slump, Slump retention, Setting time of concrete (with and without superplasticizers), Estimation of quantities and costing.

References:

1.       IS 1786 (1985 – reaffirmed 1990) Specification for high strength deformed steel bars and wires for reinforcement, Indian Standards.

2.       IS 1237 (1980- reaffirmed 1996)Specification for cement concrete flooring tiles, Indian Standards.

3.       IS 3495- Part 1,2,3 (1992- reaffirmed 2002) Methods of tests of burnt clay building bricks, Indian Standards.

4.       IS 516 (1959- reaffirmed 1999) Methods of tests forstrength of concrete, Indian Standards.

5.       IS 13311 - Part 1 & 2 (1992- reaffirmed 2004) Non-destructive testing of concrete - Methods of test, Indian Standards.

6.       IS 3085 (1965-reaffirmed 1997) Method of test forpermeability of cement mortarand concrete, Indian Standards.

7.       IS 4031 - Part 4, 5 & 6 (1988-reaffirmed 2005) Methods of physical tests forhydraulic cement, Indian Standards.

8.       IS 9103 (1999- reaffirmed 2004) Concrete admixtures – Specification, Indian Standards.

9.       IS 1199 (1959- reaffirmed 1999) Methods of sampling andanalysis of concrete, Indian Standards.

10.   IS 8142 (1976 –reaffirmed 2002) Method of test for determining setting time of concrete bypenetration resistance, Indian Standards.

11.   Dutta, B. N. Estimating and Costing in Civil Engineering- Theory and Practice, 27th revised edition, UBS publishers` Distributors Pvt. Ltd., India, 2013.

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GS-318 Applied Geology for Civil Engineers

Classification of rock forming minerals and rocks; Igneous rocks, types, characters and properties; Metamorphism and its types, structures, textures and effect on practical properties; Sedimentary environment, structure, textural classification of silici-clastic and carbonate rocks; Weathering process, transportation and sedimentation process; Geological action – wind, water, ocean, glaciers ( landforms); Seismic zones of India; Earth structure- Fold, Fault, Joints and Shear zones; Geological and Geophysical investigations for site classification; Concept of stresses and strain in rocks; Different failure criteria in rocks and rock masses; Engineering properties and strength of rocks; Rock mass classification (RQD, RMR, GSI,RMi); Rock breakage mechanism and safety of civil structures; Geological consideration for the design of Dams, tunnels, bridges and other civil works; Slope stability and stabilization methods; Case studies; 

Practical classes: Identification of common minerals and rock specimens; Measurement of shear strength of rocks; Determination of compressive and tensile strengths of rocks using UTM; Calculation of the deformability characteristic of rocks (elastic, bulk, shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio); Estimation of index properties of rocks (point load strength, slake durability, sonic wave velocity and specific gravity).

References:

1.       Parthasarathy, A., Panchapakesan, V. and Nagarajan, R. "Engineering Geology", Wiley India Pvt Ltd., 2013.  ISBN-13: 9788126541829

2.       Reddy, D. V. "Engineering Geology", Vikas Publishing House, 2010. ISBN13: 9788125919032

3.       Goodman, R. E. "Introduction to Rock Mechanics", Wiley India Pvt Ltd, 1989. ISBN10: 8126525665

4.       Bieniawski, Z. T. "Engineering Rock Mass Classifications: A Complete Manual for Engineers and Geologists in Mining, Civil, and Petroleum Engineering", Wiley-Blackwell, 1989. ISBN-10: 0471601721

5.       Goel, R. and Singh, B. "Engineering Rock Mass Classification: Tunneling, Foundations and Landslides", Elsevier, 2011. ISBN-10: 012385878X

6.       Krynine, D.P. and Judd, W.R. "Principles of Engineering Geology and Geotechnics", CBS Publishers & Distributors, New Delhi, 1957.  ISBN-10: 812390603X.

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            Course Structure (B. Tech.) - Fourth Year

First Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 401

Water Resources Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 463

Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 407

Foundation Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 4XX

Departmental Elective I

6

Departmental Elective including BTP

CE 4XX

Departmental Elective II

6

Departmental Elective including BTP

 

Institute Elective II

6

Institute Elective

Total Credits

36

 

 

Second Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 4XX

Department Elective III

6

Departmental Electives including BTP

CE 4XX

Department Elective IV

6

CE 4XX

Department Elective V

6

CE 4XX

Department Elective VI

6

Total Credits

24

 

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List of Departmental Electives

Course Code

Course Title

Credits

CE 324

Engineering Law

6

CE 402

Introduction to Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering

6

CE 403

Design of Structures III

6

CE 410

Introduction to Offshore Engineering

6

CE 418

Introduction to Finite Elements Methods

6

CE 419

Physical Modelling in Geotechnics

6

CE 429

Urban Hydrology and Drainage Systems

6

CE 434

Traffic Analysis and Design

6

CE 442

Machine Foundations

6

CE 448

Pre-stressed Concrete Design

6

CE 462

Elements of Structural Dynamics

6

CE 465

Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

6

CE 469

Advanced Solid Mechanics

6

CE 478

Plastic Analysis and Design

6

CE 480

Computer Aided Design in Civil Engineering

6

CE 482

Construction Management

6

CE 488

Environmental Geotechnics

6

CE 490

Elements of Remote Sensing.

6

CE 492

Reinforced Earth

6

CE 494

BTP-I

6

CE 495

BTP-II

6

CE 496

Irrigation Engineering and Technology

6

CE 484

Concrete Technology

6

CE 620

Advanced Finite Element Methods

6

CE 422

Hydraulic Structures

6

CE 424

Groundwater Hydrology

6

CE 676

Water Resources System

6

 


 

** The following courses are no-departmental course which can be tagged as department electives and equivalent departmental courses. Please check the corresponding department website for course content for these courses.

Note: This list was approved in the 121st DUGC meeting in March, 2017.

Relevant Non-Departmental Courses

Equivalent Department Course

 

Sno

Course Code

Name of the course

Credits

Course Code

Name of the course

Credits

1

ES 203

Water and Wastewater Engineering