Bulletin on courses of study

2015-16

B.Tech. & Dual Degree Programmes

 

Contents

Civil Engineering Department at IIT Bombay. 3

B.Tech. and Dual Degree Programmes. 3

Coursework requirements for B.Tech. Students. 4

Coursework requirements for Dual Degree Students. 4

Minor courses for B.Tech. Students. 4

B.Tech. in Civil Engineering.. 5

Course Structure - First Year. 5

Course Details for First Year. 6

Course Structure - Second Year. 20

Course Details for Second Year. 21

Course Structure - Third Year. 36

Course Structure (B. Tech.) - Fourth Year. 51

List of Departmental Electives. 52

Dual Degree (B.Tech. + M.Tech.) In Civil Engineering.. 81

CE-1: Transportation Engineering.. 81

Course Structure - Fourth Year. 81

Course Structure – Fifth Year. 87

List of CE-1 PG Electives. 88

CE-2: Geotechnical Engineering.. 100

Course Structure – Fourth Year. 100

Course Structure – Fifth Year. 102

List of CE-2 PG Electives. 103

CE-3: Water Resources Engineering.. 118

Course Structure – Fourth Year. 118

Course Structure – Fifth Year. 121

CE-4: Dual Degree in Structural Engineering.. 130

Course structure – Fourth Year. 130

Course structure – Fifth year. 134

List of CE-4: PG Electives. 134

CE-5: Dual Degree in Ocean Engineering.. 142

Course structure – Fourth year. 142

Course structure – Fifth year. 147

List of CE-5 PG Electives. 147

CE-6: Dual Degree in Remote Sensing.. 151

Course structure – Fourth Year. 151

Course Structure – Fifth Year. 155

List of CE-6 PG Electives. 156

Minor in Civil Engineering. 165


 

Civil Engineering Department at IIT Bombay

The Department of Civil Engineering has been a part of IIT Bombay since its inception in 1958. Over the years, the department has grown tremendously, and is now recognized as one of the best and major engineering departments in the country and ranked highly in the World for Civil Engineering. With its multifaceted faculty, it provides high quality teaching and instruction at both UG and PG as well as Ph. D levels. Besides, the Department is actively involved in basic and applied research and consultancy and provides high quality technical advisory support through various R & D projects and consultancy to various organizations. Civil Engineering Department continues to maintain and cultivate its strong links with the public sector companies, planning agencies, public service providers, consultation firms, construction industry, academic and research institutions both within and outside the country.

The department has attracted significant amount of sponsored research funding from government and private agencies and is delivering excellent output in terms of implementable solutions and large number of research publication in quality journals having high impact factor. The Department disseminates the knowledge gained from its high quality research through training programs and interacts with world renowned personalities through workshops and conferences. The students and faculty have won prestigious national and international awards and recognition, and continuing to bring laurels to the department and the Institute.

For more information visit    http://www.civil.iitb.ac.in

B.Tech. and Dual Degree Programmes

The Department of Civil Engineering admits 117 students in undergraduate programme. The department offers dual-degree programmes in the following six areas of specialization.

1.      Transportation Systems Engineering

2.      Geotechnical Engineering

3.      Water Resources Engineering

4.      Structural Engineering

5.      Ocean Engineering

6.      Remote Sensing[1]

The department has well-equipped laboratories with excellent advanced instrumentation and equipment for research and teaching. State-of-art computational facilities are available in the departmental computational laboratory which is equipped with new servers, workstations and personal computers. All the computers in the department are networked with the institute Local Area Network and are connected to internet through IIT Bombay’s proxy servers.

The students of the Department can use the Central Library that has more than 440,000 books and volumes, and subscribes more than 1800 current journals in Science, Engineering, Humanities and Social Sciences. Library cataloguing is fully computerized. The Department also has a library where all B. Tech., M. Tech. and Ph.D. Theses completed at the Department are available for reference. The Department has 52 faculty members and about 25 other technical and non-technical staff. The department disseminates knowledge to working professionals regularly by organizing national and international conferences and workshops. Continuing Education Programme courses are also conducted by the Department on a regular basis. The faculty publishes extensively from the research and consultancy work carried out in the Department. More than 200 research papers are published every year by the faculty in all areas of Civil Engineering in the national and international journals and conferences.

The rules and regulations pertaining to B.Tech and Dual Degree Programme at IIT Bombay can be found at: http://www.iitb.ac.in/newacadhome/rules/btechrulesnew08.pdf

Coursework requirements for B.Tech. Students

The B.Tech. Programme involves four full years of coursework that should be completed by the student to earn required credits to graduate. The minimum credit requirement for the student to graduate from Civil Engineering is 275 credits. The students can also pursue honors stream which require an additional 24 credits to be earned by the student. Students can also complete a B.Tech degree with minor if they pursue an additional 30 credits with other departments.

Coursework requirements for Dual Degree Students

The B.Tech. Programme involves five full years of coursework that should be completed by the student to earn required credits to graduate. The minimum credit requirement for the student to graduate from Civil Engineering is 395 credits.

Minor courses for B.Tech. Students

A basket of four courses are offered to students desiring to pursue a minor in Civil Engineering at undergraduate level. These courses are open to B.Tech students from other departments desiring to pursue a minor in Civil Engineering


B.Tech. in Civil Engineering

Course Structure - First Year

First Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

MA 105

Calculus

3

1

0

8

 

PH 107

Quantum Physics and application

2

1

0

6

 

CH 105

Organic/Inorganic Chemistry

2

0

0

4

 

CH 107

Physical Chemistry

2

0

0

4

 

CS 101

or

BB101

Computer Programming & Utilization

2

0

2

6

 

Biology

ME 113

Workshop Practice

0

0

4

4

 

PH 117

or

        CH 117

Physics Lab

0

0

3

3

 

Chemistry Lab

Total Credits

35

 

 

Second Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

MA 106

Linear Algebra

2

0

0

4

 

MA 108

Differential Equations-I

2

0

0

4

 

PH 108

Basics of Electricity and Magnetism

2

1

0

6

 

CS 101

Or

BB 101

Computer Programming & Utilization

2

0

2

6

 

Biology

ME 119

Engineering Graphics &Drawing

0

1

3

5

 

PH 117

Or

CH 117

Physics Lab

0

0

3

3

 

Chemistry Lab

CE 102

Engineering Mechanics

3

0

0

6

 

Total Credits

34

 

Course Details for First Year

 

MA-105 Calculus

 

Review of limits, continuity, and differentiability. Mean value theorem, Taylors Theorem, Maxima and Minima. Riemann integrals, Fundamental theorem of Calculus, Improper integrals, applications to area, volume. Convergence of sequences and series, power series. Partial Derivatives, gradient and directional derivatives, chain rule, maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Double and Triple integration, Jacobians and change of variables formula. Parametrization of curves and surfaces, vector Fields, line and surface integrals. Divergence and curl, Theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes.

 

References:

1.      Hughes-Hallett et al., Calculus - Single and Multivariable (3rd Edition), John-Wiley and Sons (2003).

2.      James Stewart, Calculus (5th Edition), Thomson (2003).

3.      T. M. Apostol, Calculus, Volumes 1 and 2 (2nd Edition), Wiley Eastern 1980

4.      G. B. Thomas and R. L. Finney, Calculus and Analytic Geometry (9th Edition), ISE Reprint, Addison-Wesley, 1998.

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PH-107 Quantum Physics and application

 

Quantum nature of light: Photoelectric Effect and Compton Effect. Stability of atoms and Bohr`s rules. Wave particle duality: De Broglie wavelength, Group and Phase velocity, Uncertainty Principle, Double Slit Experiment. Schrodinger Equation. Physical interpretation of Wave Function, Elementary Idea of Operators, Eigen-value Problem. Solution of Schrodinger equation for simple boundary value problems. Reflection and Transmission Coefficients. Tunneling. Particle in a three dimensional box, Degenerate states. Exposure to Harmonic Oscillator and Hydrogen Atom without deriving the general solution. Quantum Statistics: Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose Einstein and Fermi Dirac Statistics by detailed balance arguments. Density of states. Applications of B-E statistics: Lasers. Bose-Einstein Condensation. Applications of F-D statistics: Free electron model of electrons in metals. Concept of Fermi Energy. Elementary Ideas of Band Theory of Solids. Exposure to Semiconductors, Superconductors, Quantum Computing

References:

1.      R. Eisberg and R. Resnick, Quantum Physics: John Wiley 2002, 2nd Edition.

2.      F. K. Richtmyer, E. H. Kennard and J.N. Cooper, Introduction to Modern Physics, Tata McGraw Hill 1976, 6th Edition.

3.      K. S. Krane, Modern Physics: John Wiley 1998, 2nd Edition.

4.      Mani and Mehta, Introduction to Modern Physics: East-West Press Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi 2000.

5.      S. H. Patil, Elements of Modern Physics: Tata McGraw Hill, 1984.

6.      A Beiser, Concepts of Modern Physics, Tata McGraw Hill, 2009.

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CH-105 Organic and Inorganic Chemistry

 

Molecular orbitals of common functional groups, Qualitative Huckel MOs of conjugated polyenes and benzene. Aromaticity. Configuration, molecular chirality and isomerism, Conformation of alkanes and cycloalkanes, Reactivity of carbonyl group), Functional group interconversions involving oxidation and reduction, Periodic properties: trends in size, electron affinity, ionization potential and electronegativity, Use of Ellingham diagram and thermodynamics in the extraction of elements, Transition metal chemistry: inorganic complexes, bonding theories, magnetism, bonding aspects and structural distortion, Bioinorganic chemistry: storage and transport proteins, Catalysis: hydrogenation, hydroformylation and olefin metathesis.

References:

1.      P. Volhardt and N. Schore, Organic Chemistry: Structure and Function, 5th Edition, W. H Freeman & Co, 2006

2.      T. W. G. Solomons, C. B. Fryhle, Organic Chemistry, 9th Edition, WilelyIndia Pvt. Ltd., 2009

3.      R. T. Morrison and R. N. Boyd, Organic Chemistry, 6th edition, Pearson Com., 1992

4.      L. G. Wade, Organic Chemistry, Pearson Education 6th edition, 2006.

5.      M. J. Sienko and R. A. Plane, Chemical Principles and Applications, McGraw Hill, 1980.

6.      J. D. Lee, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 4th Edition, ELBS, 1991.

7.      D. D. Ebbing, General Chemistry, Houghton Miffin Co., 1984.

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CH-107 Physical Chemistry

 

Schrodinger equation, Origin of quantization, Born interpretation of wave function, Hydrogen atom: solution to part, Atomic orbitals, many electron atoms and spin orbitals. Chemical bonding: MO theory: LCAO molecular orbitals, Structure, bonding and energy levels of diatomic molecules. Concept of sp, sp2and sp3hybridization; Bonding and shape of many atom molecules; Intermolecular Forces; Potential energy surfaces-Rates of reactions; Steady state approximation and its applications; Concept of pre-equilibrium; Equilibrium and related thermodynamic quantities

References:

1.      P. Atkins and J. de Paula, Atkins302222 Physical Chemistry, Oxford University Press, 8th edition, 2006.

2.      I. N. Levine, Physical Chemistry, 5th edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2002.

3.      D. A. McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, Physical Chemistry - a molecular approach, Viva Books Pvt. Ltd. (1998).

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CS-101 Computer Programming and Utilization

 

This course provides an introduction to problem-solving with computers using a modern languages such as Java or C/C++. Topics covered will include: Utilization: Developer fundamentals such as editor, integrated programming environment, Unix shell, modules, libraries; Programming features: Machine representation, primitive types, arrays and records, objects, expressions, control statements, iteration, procedures, functions, and basic i/o;  Sample problems in engineering, science, text processing, and numerical methods.

References:

1.      Cohoon and Davidson , C++ Program Design: An introduction to Programming and Object-Oriented Design, 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill. 2003.

2.      Gary Bronson, A First Book of C++, 2nd Ed, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning

 

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BB-101 Biology

 

Quantitative views of modern biology. Importance of illustrations and building quantitative/qualitative models. Role of estimates. Cell size and shape. Temporal scales. Relative time in Biology. Key model systems - a glimpse. Management and transformation of energy in cells. Mathematical view - binding, gene expression and osmotic pressure as examples. Metabolism. Cell communication. Genetics. Eukaryotic genomes. Genetic basis of development. Evolution and diversity. Systems biology and illustrative examples of applications of Engineering in Biology.

References:

1.       R. Phillips, J. Kondev and J. Theriot., Physical Biology of the Cell. Garland science publishers. 2008. 1st edition.

2.      J.B.Reece, L.A.Urry, M.L.Cain, S.A.Wasserman, P.V.Minorsky, R.B.Jackson., Campbell Biology. Benjamin Cummings publishers. 2010. 9th edition.

 

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ME-113 Workshop Practice

 

Introduction to wood work: hand tools & various operations. Introduction to pattern making: types of patterns, allowances, colour coding. etc. Introduction to bench work & fitting: tools & operations. Introduction to metal cutting and machine tools: Safety measures, principles of operation of basic machine tools like lathe, shaping, &drilling. Important operations on these machines. Cutting tools and their usage, selection of cutting speeds, feeds, etc. Introduction to welding. Assignments: Simple assignments in wood working, fitting, electric arcwelding, lathe and shaping machine work.

References:

1.       Elements of Workshop Technology, Vol. I by S. K. Hajrachoudhury &Others, Media Promoters and Publishers, Mumbai. 14th Edition, 2007.

2.      Elements of Workshop Technology, Vol. II by S. K. Hajrachoudhury &Others, Media Promoters and Publishers, Mumbai. 12th Edition, 2007.

3.      Workshop Practice by H. S. Bawa, Tata-McGraw Hill, 2004.

 

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PH-117 Physics Lab

 

 

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CH-117 Chemistry Lab

 

Experiments illustrating the concepts of 1) galvanic cells, (2) thermochemistry, (3) chemical kinetics, (4) equilibrium constant, (5) analysis by oxidation reduction titration.

 

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MA-106 Linear Algebra

 

Vectors in Rn, notion of linear independence and dependence, linear span of a set of vectors, vector subspaces of Rn, basis of a vector subspace. Systems of linear equations, matrices and Gauss elimination, row space, null space, and column space, rank of a matrix. Determinants and rank of a matrix in terms of determinants. Abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, matrix of a linear trans- formation, change of basis and similarity, rank-nullity theorem. Inner pro duct spaces, Gram-Schmidt process, orthonormal bases, projections and least squares approximation. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, characteristic polynomials, eigenvalues of special matrices (orthogonal, unitary, Hermitian, symmetric, skew- symmetric, normal). Algebraic and geometric multiplicity, diagonalization by similarity transformations, spectral theorem for real symmetric matrices, application to quadratic forms.

References:

1.      H. Anton, Elementary linear algebra with applications (8th Edition), John Wiley (1995).

2.      G. Strang, Linear algebra and its applications (4th Edition), Thomson (2006).

3.      S. Kumaresan, Linear algebra - A Geometric approach, Prentice Hall of India (2000).

4.      E. Kreyszig, Advanced engineering mathematics (8th Edition), John Wiley (1999).

 

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MA-108 Differential Equations

 

Exact equations, integrating factors and Bernoulli equations. Orthogonal trajectories. Lipschitz condition, Picard’s theorem, examples on nonuniqueness. Linear differential equations generalities. Linear dependence and Wronskians. Dimensionality of space of solutions, Abel-Liouville formula. Linear ODEs with constant coefficients, the characteristic equations. Cauchy-Euler equations. Method of undetermined coefficients. Method of variation of parameters. Laplace transform generalities. Shifting theorems.

References:

1.      E. Kreyszig, Advanced engineering mathematics (8th Edition), John Wiley (1999).

2.      W. E. Boyce and R. DiPrima, Elementary Differential Equations (8th Edition), John Wiley (2005).

3.      T. M. Apostol, Calculus, Volume 2 (2nd Edition), Wiley Eastern, 1980.

 

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PH-108 Basics of Electricity and Magnetism

 

Review of vector calculus: Spherical polar and cylindrical coordinates; gradient, divergence and curl; Divergence and Stokes` theorems; Divergence and curl of electric field, Electric potential, properties of conductors; Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations, uniqueness theorems, boundary value problems, separation of variables, method of images, multipoles; Polarization and bound charges, Gauss` law in the presence of dielectrics, Electric displacement D and boundary conditions, linear dielectrics; Divergence and curl of magnetic field, Vector potential and its applications; Magnetization, bound currents, Ampere`s law in magnetic materials, Magnetic field H, boundary conditions, classification of magnetic materials; Faraday’s law in integral and differential forms, Motional emf, Energy in magnetic fields, Displacement current, Maxwell’s equations, Electromagnetic (EM) waves in vacuum and media, Energy and momentum of EM waves, Poynting`s theorem; Reflection and transmission of EM waves across linear media.

References:

1.      Introduction to Electrodynamics (3rd ed.), David J. Griffiths, Prentice Hall, 2011.

2.      Classical Electromagnetism, J. Franklin, Pearson Education, 2005.

 

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ME-119 Engineering Graphics and Drawing

 

Introduction to engineering drawing and orthographic projections; Projection of points and straight line; Projection of planes and solids; Projection of simple machine elements; Development of surfaces, Intersection of surfaces; Construction of isometric views from orthographic projections.

References:

1.      Bhatt N. D. and Panchal V. M., Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishers, Anand, 2007.

2.      Luzadder Warren J. and Duff Jon M., Fundamentals of Engineering Drawing, Prentice Hall of India, 2001.

3.      French Thomas E. and Vierck Charles J., Engineering Drawing and Graphic Technology, McGraw Hill, 1993.

4.      Jolhe Dhananjay A., Engineering Drawing, Tata McGraw Hill, 2007.

5.      Shah M. B. and Rana B. C., Engineering Drawing, Dorling Kindersley (India) Pvt. Ltd, Pearson Education,

 

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CE-102 Engineering Mechanics

 

Equivalent Force Systems: Basic concepts of force-couple systems. Planar force systems: parallel force systems; simplest equivalent for general force system- "wrench". Distributed force systems. Equations of Statics and its Applications: Simple frictionless rigid body assemblies; two force members: machines: trusses: cables: rigid body assemblies including friction. Virtual Work and Potential Energy Principles: Application of these principles as replacement of equations of statics for real life problems. Vibrations: Equations of motion for single degree-of-freedom systems and rigid body assemblies: free vibration (simple harmonic oscillator): concepts of damping and critical damping: damped free vibration: equations of motion for harmonic excitation: transient and steady-state vibrations: illustration of MDOF systems concepts with two degree-of-freedom systems.

References:

1.      I.H. Shames, "Introduction to Solid Mechanics, Second Edition, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 1989.

2.      F.P. Beer and Jhonston, "Mechanics for Engineers", McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1987,

 

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Course Structure - Second Year

First Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 201

Solid Mechanics

3

1

0

8

Core Course

CE 205

Fluid Mechanics

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 211

Solid Mechanics Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE213

Fluid Mechanics Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

EE 101

Introduction to Electrical and Electronics Circuits

3

1

0

8

MA 207

Differential Equations-II

2

0

0

4

HS 101

Economics

3

0

0

6

Total Credits

38

 

 

Second Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 204

Geodesy

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 206

Applied Hydraulic Engineering

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 216

Geodesy Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE 218

Hydraulic Engineering Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE 222

Structural Mechanics I

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 232

Building Materials and Construction

3

0

0

6

Core Course

ES 200

Environmental Studies: Science and Engineering

 

 

 

3

 

HS 200

Environmental Studies

 

 

 

3

 

Total Credits

36

 

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Course Details for Second Year

 

CE-201 Solid Mechanics - I

 

Rigid and deformable solids; Method of sections for evaluating internal forces in bodies - review of free body diagrams; Concept of stress - normal and shear stresses; State of stress; Concept of strain - normal and shear strains; State of strain; Hooke’s law; Constitutive relations; Axially loaded members, force and deflections; Indeterminate systems and compatibility conditions; Simple indeterminate systems and lack of fit problems; Generalized Hooke’s law; Stress in cylindrical and spherical shells; Torsion of circular shafts - determinate and simple indeterminate systems. Elastic theory of bending of beams; Shear force and bending moment diagrams; Bending and shearing stresses in beams of symmetrical cross-section; Concept of shear flow and shear center; Principle of superposition and its limitations. Transformation of plane stress and strain; Principal stresses and strains; Mohr’s circle. Bending deflection of beams by direct integration method; Application of direct integration method to simple indeterminate systems; Elastic buckling of compression members.

 

References:

1.      E.P. Popov, Engineering Mechanics of Solids, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hill, New Delhi, 1999.

2.      F.P. Beer, E.R. Johnston and J.T. DeWolf, Mechanics of Materials, 3rd Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2004.

3.      I.H. Shames and J.M. Pitarresi, Introduction to the Solid Mechanics, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hill, New Delhi, 1989.

4.      J.M. Gere, Mechanics of Materials, 5th Ed., Brooks/Cole, Chennai, 2001.

5.      S.H. Crandall, N.C. Dhal and T.J. Lardner, Mechanics of Solids: An Introduction, McGraw Hill, Tokyo, 1994.

6.      S.M.A. Kazimi, Solid Mechanics, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1981.

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CE-205 Fluid Mechanics - I

 

Fundamental Concepts of Fluid Flow: Fundamental definitions, Flow characteristics, Classification of fluids, Fluid properties, Foundations of flow analysis. Fluid Statics: Fluid pressure, Forces on solid surfaces, Buoyant forces. Kinematics of Fluid Flow: Equations for acceleration, Continuity equation, Irrotational and rotational flow, Potential and stream functions. Dynamics of Fluid Flow: Finite control volume analysis, Euler and Bernoulli’s theorems, Impulse momentum theory, Applications of energy and momentum equations. Laminar and Turbulent Flows: Types of flow, Reynolds experiment, Laminar flow between parallel plates, Laminar flow in pipes, Turbulent flow in pipes. Navier-Stokes Equations and Applications: Introduction to Navier-Stokes equations, Exact solutions for simple cases of flow, Plane Poiseuille flow, Coute flow, Stokes flow and porous media flow. Boundary Layer Theory and Applications: Concepts of boundary layer, Flow separation, Circulation, Drag and lift on immersed bodies.

References:

1.      V.L. Streeter and E.B. Wylie, Fluid Mechanics, McGraw Hill, 1998.

2.      Granger, R.A., Fluid Mechanics, CBS College Publishing, New York, 1985.

3.      J.F. Douglas, J.M. Gasiorek, and J.A. Swaffield, Fluid Mechanics, Addison-Wesley, Harlow 1999.

4.      I.H. Shames, Mechanics of Fluids, McGraw Hill, New York, 1992.

5.      R.L. Daugherthy, J.B. Franzini and E.J. Finnemore, Fluid Mechanics with Engineering Applications, McGraw Hill, New York, 1985.

6.      A.K. Jain, Fluid Mechanics, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 1998.

7.      L.P.N. Modi and S.M. Seth, Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics, Standard Book House, New Delhi, 2002

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CE-211 Solid Mechanics Lab - I

 

Tension test on mild steel and cast iron rods, impact test on metal, compression and shear test on Neoprene pad specimens, buckling of slender steel columns, torsion test on round mild steel and cast iron rods, indentation hardness test on metals. Measurement of strain by electrical resistance strain gauge (cantilever beam), evaluation of Poisson??s ratio on mild steel flat, deflection of simply supported, location of shear centre in a channel section, unsymmetrical bending. Compression test on plane concrete cube and cylinder, ultrasonic test on concrete cube.

References:

1.      H.E. Davis, G.E. Troxell and C.R. Litecky, Inspection and Testing of Engineering Materials, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill, New York, 1964.

2.      E.P. Popov, Introduction to Mechanics of Solids, Prentice Hill, New Delhi, 1973.

3.      American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), Annual Book of ASTM Standards, 2005.

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CE-213 Fluid Mechanics Lab - I

 

Study experiments: Ideal fluid motion past a two-dimensional circular cylinder by means of electrical analogues, Boundary layer growth analysis in a wind tunnel, Minor transition losses in pipes, friction factors in pipe, Flow measurements by orifices, venturimeter and notches, Bernoulli apparatus, Reynolds apparatus. Flow net studies around circular cylinder, Verification of Darcy’s law.

References:

1.      W.R. Lamox, Laboratory work in hydraulics, Granada Publishers, London, 1979.

2.      S. Narasimhan, Fluid Mechanics Laboratory: A Manual for Experiments, Curriculum Development Programme, IIT Bombay, 1982.

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EE-101 Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Circuits

 

Introduction, basic physical laws, circuit elements, KVL, KCL, and a few important circuit theorems, simple circuits, Transients in R-L, R-C, R-L-C, Sinusoidal Steady State, Real/Reactive Power, Three Phase, Working Principles of Transformers/AC/DC machines. Functional Characteristics of Diode, BJT, OP-AMP Analog circuit Examples: rectifiers, amplifiers, oscillators etc. Digital Circuits: AND/OR gates, Flip Flops, DAC/ADC etc.

References:

1.      Vincent Del Toro, `Electrical Engineering Fundamental, Prentice Hall, 1989

2.      K.A.Krishnamurthy and M.R.Raghuveer, `Electrical and Electronics Engineering for Scientists`, Wiley Eastern Ltd., 1993.

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MA-207 Differential Equations - II

 

Review of power series and series solutions of ODE??s. Legendre??s equation and Legendre polynomials. Regular and irregular singular points, method of Frobenius. Bessel’s equation and Bessel’s functions. Strum-Liouville problems. Fourier series. D’Alembert solution to the Wave equation. Classification of linear second order PDE in two variables. Laplace, Wave, and Heat equations using separation of variables. Vibration of a circular membrane. Heat equation in the half space.

References:

1.      E. Kreyszig, Advanced engineering mathematics (8th Edition), John Wiley (1999).

2.      W. E. Boyce and R. DiPrima, Elementary Differential Equations (8th Edition), John Wiley (2005).

3.      R. V. Churchill and J. W. Brown, Fourier series and boundary value problems (7th Edition), McGraw-Hill (2006).

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HS-101 Economics

 

Basic economic problems. Resource constraints and Welfare maximizations. Nature of Economics: Positive and normative economics; Micro and macroeconomics, Basic concepts in economics. The role of the State in economic activity; market and government failures; New Economic Policy in India. Theory of utility and consumer’s choice. Theories of demand, supply and market equilibrium. Theories of firm, production and costs. Market structures. Perfect and imperfect competition, oligopoly, monopoly. An overview of macroeconomics, measurement and determination of national income. Consumption, savings, and investments. Commercial and central banking. Relationship between money, output and prices. Inflation - causes, consequences and remedies. International trade, foreign exchange and balance payments, stabilization policies: Monetary, Fiscal and Exchange rate policies.

References:

1.      P. A. Samuelson & W. D. Nordhaus, Economics, McGraw Hill, NY, 1995.

2.      A. Koutsoyiannis, Modern Microeconomics, Macmillan, 1975.

3.      R. Pindyck and D. L. Rubinfeld, Microeconomics, Macmillan publishing company, NY, 1989.

4.      R. J. Gordon, Macroeconomics 4th edition, Little Brown and Co., Boston, 1987.

5.      William F. Shughart II, The Organization of Industry, Richard D. Irwin, Illinois, 1990.

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CE-204 Geodesy

 

Introduction to Plane & Geodetic Surveying, Fundamental Principles, Earth Ellipsoid, Geodetic Datums and Coordinate Systems, Control Surveys: Horizontal & Vertical: Triangulation, Traverse, Leveling, Instrumentation: Total Stations, EDMs, Digital Levels; Engineering Surveying, Data Processing, Legendre302222s Theorem, Theory of Errors and Adjustment Computations, Introduction to Space Geodetic Techniques: GPS, Introduction to Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing, Maps & Map-making.

References:

1.      W. Torge, Geodesy, 3rd Revised Ed., Walter de Gruyter, Berlin-New York, 2001.

2.      G. Bomford, Geodesy, 4th Ed., Oxford Press, London, 1994.

3.      B.C. Punmia, A.K. Jain and A.K. Jain, Surveying, Vol. 1 and II, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi, 1996.

4.      R.E. Davis, F.S. Foote and J.W. Kelly, Surveying: Theory and Practice, 7th Ed., McGraw Hill, New York, 1980.

5.      D.Clark, Plane and Geodetic Surveying, Vol. I and II, Constable and Company, London, 1980.

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CE-206 Applied Hydraulic Engineering

Dimensional Analysis, Model similitude, Model scales, Physical modeling, Computational hydraulics, Theory and applications. Momentum and energy equations, Correction factors, Specific energy, Specific force,Criticalflows; Uniform and non-uniform flows – properties, design of channels, Gradually varied flows– Theory and analysis, typical method of computation. Rapidly varied flows – flow over a spillway, hydraulic jump, control and stabilization, Unsteady flows – basic equations, uniformly progressive flow, flood waves, flood routing. Revisiting Major and minor losses; components of water distribution system; Multiple reservoir problem; Pipe network: Hardy-cross method; Unsteady flow in pipes: water hammer, Surge tank; Water distribution systems and analysis; Intakes, pumping and transportation of water; Appurtenances of water transport and distribution systems. Essentials of water supply; Water Demand and Quantity Estimation: Design period, population forecast; Domestic water standards; Sources of water and their yield; Water quality: definitions and characteristics, suspended solids, turbidity, alkalinity, hardness, fluoride, metals, Nutrients, BOD and COD; Processes of water treatment: Aeration, sedimentation and flocculation; Settling, coagulation, Softening, Filtration: slow and rapid sand filters; chlorination and other disinfecting methods

References:

1.      Vent te Chow (2009), “Open Channel Hydraulics”, McGraw-hill, New Delhi.

2.      K.G. Rangaraju (1993), Flow in Open Channels, Tata McGraw Hill Publication Co. Ltd., New Delhi.

3.      K. Subramanya (1992), Flow in Open Channels, Tata McGraw Hill Publication Co. Ltd.,New Delhi.

4.      R.H. French (1986), Open Channel Hydraulics, McGraw Hill Book Co., New York.

5.      Peavy, Rowe and Tchobanoglous, (2003), Environmental Engineering, McGraw-hill, New York. S.K.

6.      Garg, (2005) “Environmental Engineering 1: Water Supply Engineering”, Khanna Publisher, New Delhi.

7.      R. Srivastava (2010), “Flow through open channels”, Oxford University Press (2008)

8.      Jain A K, “Fluid Mechanics”, Khanna Publisher, New Delhi.

9.      M.J. Hammer, (1986), Water and Waste Water Technology, John Wiley and Sons, New York.

10.   CPHEEO: Manual on Water Supply and Treatment, Ministry of Urban Development, 1991.

11.   CPHEEO: Manual on Sewerage and Sewage Treatment, Ministry of Works and Housing, New Delhi, 1980.                                                                                   Back to course structure

CE-216 Geodesy Lab

 

Angular & Distance Observations with Digital Theodolites, EDMs and Total Stations, Triangulation & Traversing, Leveling, Surveying & Mapping using Global Positioning System.

References:

 

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CE-218 Hydraulic Design Lab

 

Seepage analysis - Heleshaw model; Infiltration experiment - Infiltrometer; Groundwater Flow model; Permeability studies; Hydraulic jump experiments; Channel expansion and contraction studies; Small surges and wave experiments; Flow measurements in open channels – Flow over a weir,  sharp and broad crested weirs, spillway; Boundary layer flows – wind tunnel; Hydrology – rainfall simulator, overland and channel flow experiments; Flow in pipes – Pipe network; Sedimentation and scour studies – settling tank, sedimentation flume, scour at structures

References:

1.      W.R. Lamox, Laboratory work in hydraulics, Granada Publishers, London, 1979.

2.      S. Narasimhan, Fluid Mechanics Laboratory – A Manual for Experiments, Curriculum Development Programme, IIT Bombay, 1982.

3.      V.T. Chow, Open Channel Hydraulics, McGraw Hill, London, 1975.

4.      V.L. Streeter and E.B. Wylie, Fluid Mechanics,  McGraw Hill, London, 1998.

 

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CE-222 Structural Mechanics - I

 

Analysis of Statically Determinate Structures - Determination of forces in trusses, frames, arches, and cables; Drawing bending moment, shear force and axial force diagrams; Computation of displacements using principle of virtual work; Moment-area method, Conjugate-beam method; Energy Principles; Maxwell’s and Betti’s laws; Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Structures - Concept of static indeterminacy; Concept of compatibility conditions; Method of consistent deformations for statically indeterminate trusses, beams, frames, arches; Matrix formulation of force method; Influence Lines - Concept of influence lines using equilibrium methods, and by using Muller Breslau principle for both statically determinate and indeterminate structures.

References:

1.      H.H. West, Fundamentals of Structural Analysis, Wiley, New York, 1993.

2.      C.H. Norris, J.B. Wilbur and S. Utku, Elementary Structural Analysis, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill International, Tokyo, 1976.

3.      C.S. Reddy, Basic Structural Analysis, 2nd Ed. Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1996.

4.      L.S. Negi and R.S. Jangid, Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1997.

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ES-200 Environmental Studies: Science and Engineering

 

 

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CE-232 Building Materials and Construction

 

Building Materials: Introduction, Structure and properties of materials - Stone, brick (Clay and Fly ash), Hollow blocks, Tiles, Steel, Cement concrete, Glass. (IS codes/ ASTM codes for assessing the Engineering property of materials and relevant test procedures will be discussed)                 

Building Construction: Building systems, Foundations, Masonry, Walls, Floors, Lintels and arches, Roofs, Formwork and scaffolding, Plastering and Pointing, Weather proofing, Construction Equipments

References:

1.      M. S. Mamlouk and J. P. Zaniewski, “Materials for Civil and Construction Engineers,” 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, USA, 2010.

2.      W. D. Callister, Jr., “Materials Science and Engineering – An Introduction,” 3rd Ed., John Wiley and Sons, USA, 1994.

3.      P. C. Varghese, “Building Materials”, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., India, 2005.

4.      K. S. Jagadish, Alternative building materials technology, New Age International, India, 2007.

5.      B. C. Punmia, Building Construction, 5th Ed., Laxmi Publications, India, 1993.

6.      W. B. McKay, “Building Construction – Volumes 1 - 4,” 5th Edition, Orient Longman, UK, 1993.

7.      R. Chudley, “Construction Technology – Volumes 1 - 2,” 2nd Edition, Longman, UK, 1987.

8.      P. C. Varghese, “Building Construction”, PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., India, 2007.

9.      P. Spence and E. Kultermann, “Construction Materials, Methods and Techniques: Building for a Sustainable Future”, 3rd Ed., Cengage Learning, USA, 2010.

 

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HS-200 Environmental Studies

 

 

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Course Structure - Third Year

First Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 303

Geotechnical Engineering I

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 307

Structural Design - I

2

0

2

6

Core Course

CE 310

Transportation Engineering I

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 317

Structural Mechanics II

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 319

Geotechnical Engineering Lab I

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE 328

Transportation Engineering Lab

0

0

3

3

Core Course

HS XXX

Humanities Elective - I

3

0

0

6

Humanities Elective

Total Credits

36

 

 

Second Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 304

Geotechnical Engineering II

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 308

Structural Design II

2

0

2

6

Core Course

CE 334

Transportation Engineering II

2

1

0

3

Core Course

CE 314

Geotechnical Engineering Lab II

0

0

3

3

Core Course

CE 321

Estimation and Materials Testing Laboratory

0

0

3

3

Core Course

ES 3XX

Applied Geology for Civil Engineers

2

0

2

6

Core Course

Institute Elective I

 

 

 

6

 

Total Credits

36

 

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Humanities Electives offered in 3rd year 1st semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credits

HS 301

Philosophy

6

HS 303

Psychology

6

HS 305

Reading Literature

6

HS 307

Sociology

6

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

CE-303 Geotechnical Engineering I

 

Origin of Soils and Rocks; Rock cycle; Basic relationships; Index properties of aggregates; Soil structure; Soil classification; Soil compaction; laboratory compaction; factors affecting soil compaction; Field compaction; Soil-water statics; Effective stress; Capillarity phenomenon in soils; Flow through soils; Quick sand condition; Permeability and methods for its determination; Flownets; Stresses in soil from surface loads; Boussinesq theory; Newmarks chart, Contact pressures; Consolidation of soils; Settlement of compressible soil layers.

References:

1.      Terzaghi, K., Peck, R. B. &Mesri, G., “Soil Mechanics in Engineering Practice”, Wiley, 1996.

2.      Craig, R.F. “Craig’s Soil Mechanics”, 7th Ed., Spon Press, 2004.

3.      Holtz, R.D. & Kovacs, W.D., “An Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering”, Prentice Hall, 1981.

4.      Lambe, T.W. & Whitman, R.V., “Soil Mechanics”, John Wiley & Sons, 1979.

5.      Mitchell, J.K. & Soga, K., “Fundamentals of Soil Behaviour”, John Wiley & Sons, 2005.

6.      Ranjan, Gopal & Rao, A.S.R., “Basic and Applied Soil Mechanics”, New Age Int. Pvt. Ltd., 2004.

7.      Bolton, M.D. “A Guide to Soil Mechanics”, Universities Press, 2003.

8.      Das, B.M. “Principles of Geotechnical Engineering”, Thomson Books, 2006.

9.      Murthy, V. N. S. “Geotechnical Engineering: Principles and Practices of

10.    Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering”, CRC Press, 2002.

11.   Coduto, D.P. “Geotechnical Engineering: Principles and Practices”,

12.    Pearson Education, Prentice Hall, 2007.

13.   Goodman, R. E. “Introduction to Rock Mechanics” John Wiley & Sons, 1989.

 

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CE-307 Structural Design I

 

Location of structural members; Load calculations and preliminary design; Design studio; Computer analysis of buildings; Design and drawing for various structural members; Detailing.

References:

1.      P. Dayaratnam, Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures, 3rd Ed., Oxford-IBH Publications, New Delhi 1998.

2.      P.C. Varghese, Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design, Prentice Hall India, New Delhi, 2001.

 

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CE-310 Transportation Engineering I

 

Introduction to transportation systems engineering; Transportation system characteristics; Planning of highway, railway and airport systems; Highway/railway route selection; Airport site selection; Geometric design of highway, railway and airfield elements; Pavement/track materials and testing; Material characterization for design; Design of highway and airfield pavements; Structural design of the railway track; Highway construction, maintenance and rehabilitation.

References:

1.      C.S. Papacostas and P.D. Prevedouros,TransportationEngineering and Planning, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall,New Jersey, 2001.

2.      J.H. Banks, Introduction to Transportation Engineering, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2002.

3.      P.H. Wright and K. Dixon, Highway Engineering,th Ed., Wiley, New York, 2003.

4.      S.K. Khanna and C.E.G. Justo, Highway Engineering,Khanna Publishers, Roorkee, 2001.

5.      L.R. Kadiyali, Principles and Practice of Highway Engineering, Khanna Technical Publications, Delhi, 2000.

6.      Y.H. Huang, Pavement Analysis and Design, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2003.

7.      R. Horonjeff and F.X. Mckelvey, Planning andDesign of Airports, McGraw Hill,New York, 1994.

8.      S.C. Sexena and S.P. Arora, A Text Book ofRailway Engineering, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, New Delhi, 1998.

9.      W.W. Hay, Railroad Engineering,Wiley,New York, 1988.

 

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CE-317 Structural Mechanics II

 

Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Structures - Concept of kinematic indeterminacy; Degrees of freedom; Development of slope-deflection equations; Concept of relative stiffness; Moment distribution method and application to beams and simple frames; Matrix formulation of displacement methods - Stiffness matrix approach with reference to computer application; Generation of 1-dimensional frame element stiffness matrix, flexural, axial & shear deformations,. Torsional effects; Concept of local effects, generation of load vector, Effects of finite joints;. Application to plane frames, space frames, grid structures; Matrix formulation of force and displacement methods - Solution of simultaneous equations; Stiffness matrix approach with reference to computer application; Generation of 1-dimensional frame element stiffness matrix, flexibility and displacement approaches; Torsional effects; Concept of local effects, generation of load vector, Effects of finite joints; Application to plane frames, space frames, grid structures, Introduction to Finite Elements Method for 2-D plane problems..

References:

1.      W. Weaver and J.M. Gere, Matrix Analysis of Framed Structures, 3rd Ed., Von. Nastrand, New York, 1990.

2.      H.H. West, Fundamentals of Structural Analysis, Wiley, New York, 1993.

3.      C.S. Reddy, Basic Structural Analysis, 2nd Ed. Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1996.

4.      J.S. Przemieniecki, Theory of Matrix Structural Analysis, Dover, New York, 1968.

5.      G.S. Pandit and S.P. Gupta, Structural Analysis - A Matrix Approach, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi 1994.

6.      M.B. Kanchi, Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis, Wiley Eastern, New Delhi, 1993.

7.      L.S. Negi and R.S. Jangid, Structural Analysis, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1997.

8.      S. Utku, C.H. Norris and J.B. Wilbur, Elementary Structural Analysis,3022404th Ed., McGraw Hill College, New York, 1990..

 

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CE-319 Geotechnical Engineering Lab I

 

Identification and processing of soils, Determination of moisture content of soils, Absorption test for rocks, Particle size distribution using sieve analysis and hydrometer analysis for soils, Specific gravity test, Atterberg limit tests for soils, Standard Proctor compaction test for soils, Field density measurements for soils, Permeability tests for soils.

References:

1.      B.M. Das, “Soil Mechanics Laboratory Manual”, 6th Ed., London, University Press, 2001.

2.      J.E. Bowles, “Physical Properties of Soils”, 2nd Ed., McGraw Hill International, Singapore, 1990.

3.      Ramamurthy, T. “Engineering in Rocks for Slopes, Foundation and

4.      Tunnels”, Prentice Hall India Pvt. Ltd., 2007..

 

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CE-328 Transportation Engineering Lab I

 

Laboratory testing of road aggregates, bituminous binders and mixes for their suitability in road construction with reference to IRC/BIS specifications. Sub grade evaluation - California bearing ratio, resilient modulus, modulus of sub grade reaction; Pavement evaluation studies - measurement of pavement distresses, deflection studies; Traffic studies.

References:

1.      S. K. Khanna and C.E.G Justo, Highway Material Testing (Laboratory Manual) Nem Chand & Bros, Roorkee.

2.      Relevant IRC/BIS/ASTM Specifications

3.      Relevant highway design software manual Relevant IRC/BIS/ASTM codes.

4.      R.P. Roess, E.S. Prassas and W.R. McShane, Traffic Engineering, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2004.

5.      Highway Capacity Manual, Transportation Research Board,National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000.

 

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HS-301 Philosophy

 

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HS-303 Psychology

 

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HS-305 Reading Literature

Reading of and reading into (interpreting) a variety of literary texts; analysing the art of literature; evaluation of the context(s) of reading and the reader-text relationship (s).

References:

1.      Meyer, Michale, ed. The Bedford Introduction of Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 6th edition, 2001.

2.      Kennedy, X.J., and Dana Goia, eds. Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Longman, 10th edition, 2006.

3.      Lawall, Sarah N. Ed. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. W W Norton & Company; 2nd expanded edition. Volumes A-F. 2003

 

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HS-307 Sociology

 

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CE-304 Geotechnical Engineering II

Surface and subsurface investigations; Boring, drilling and sampling; Field tests for soils and rocks (SPT, CPT, VST, PMT, DMT, DCPT, PLT); Sand drains; Shear strength of soils and rocks; Mohr circle of stress; Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion; Hoek and Brown failure criterion; Estimation of shear strength parameters for soil and rock; Stress paths; Theories of earth pressure and retaining walls; excavation; bracing system; stability of slopes; Earth and rock-fill dams

References:

1.      Terzaghi, K., Peck, R. B. & Mesri, G., “Soil Mechanics in Engineering Practice”, Wiley, 1996.

2.      Craig, R.F. “Craig’s Soil Mechanics”, 7th Ed., Spon Press, 2004.

3.      Holtz, R.D. & Kovacs, W.D., “An Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering”, Prentice Hall, 1981.

4.      Lambe, T.W. & Whitman, R.V., “Soil Mechanics”, John Wiley & Sons, 1979.

5.      Mitchell, J.K. & Soga, K., “Fundamentals of Soil Behaviour”, John Wiley & Sons, 2005.

6.      Ranjan, Gopal & Rao, A.S.R., “Basic and Applied Soil Mechanics”, New Age Int. Pvt. Ltd., 2004.

7.      Bolton, M.D. “A Guide to Soil Mechanics”, Universities Press, 2003.

8.      Das, B.M. “Principles of Geotechnical Engineering”, Thomson Books, 2006.

9.      Murthy, V. N. S. “Geotechnical Engineering: Principles and Practices of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering”, CRC Press, 2002.

10.   Coduto, D.P. “Geotechnical Engineering: Principles and Practices”, Pearson Education, Prentice Hall, 2007.

11.   Goodman, R. E. “Introduction to Rock Mechanics” John Wiley & Sons, 1989.

12.   Ramamurthy, T. “Engineering in Rocks for Slopes, Foundation and Tunnels”, Prentice Hall India Pvt. Ltd., 2007

 

 

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CE-308 Structural Design II

Design and drawing of built-up compression members; plate girder design, design and drawing of laced/buttened columns with base plate; moment resistant designs.

References:

1.      A.S. Arya and J.L. Ajmani, Design of Steel Structures, Nem Chand & Bros., Roorkee, 1990.

2.      S.M.A. Kazimi and R.S. Jindal, Design of Steel Structures, Prentice Hall (India), New Delhi,1981.

3.      S.K. Duggal, Design of Steel Structures, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1993

 

 

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CE-334 Transportation Engineering II

Traffic Operations: Traffic stream components and characteristics; Theories of traffic flow; Traffic studies; Design of control strategies for simple systems like intersections, roundabouts, freeways, etc.; Capacity and level of services of various transportation facilities. Transportation Planning: Introduction to urban and regional transportation planning; Urban transportation planning process; Introduction to urban transportation model system; Evaluation of Transportation Systems: Economic analysis; Environmental impact assessment; Financial analysis. Laboratory testing of sub grade soils, aggregates, bituminous binders and mixes for their suitability in road construction with reference to IRC/BIS specifications; Traffic studies; Pavement evaluation tests.

References:

1.      J.H. Banks, Introduction to Transportation Engineering, McGraw Hill, New York, 2002.

2.      C.S. Papacostas and P.D. Prevedouros, Transportation Engineering and Planning, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall,New Jersey, 2001.

3.      R.P. Roess, E.S. Prassas and W.R. McShane, Traffic Engineering, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2004.

4.      Highway Capacity Manual, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000.

5.      J.D. Ortuzar and L.G. Willumsen, Modelling Transport, 3rd Ed., Wiley, New York, 2002.

6.      M. Meyer and E.J. Miller, Urban Transportation Planning, 2nd Ed., McGraw Hill, New York, 2001

 

 

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CE-314 Geotechnical Engineering Lab II

Consolidation of soils, shear strength of soils and rocks, direct shear test of soils, UCC test on soils, Triaxial test - UU, CU type tests on soils, UCS & Triaxial test on rocks; Laboratory vane shear test for soils.

References:

1.      B.M. Das, “Soil Mechanics Laboratory Manual”, 6th Ed., London, University Press, 2001.

2.      J.E. Bowles, “Physical Properties of Soils”, 2nd Ed., McGraw HillInternational, Singapore, 1990.

3.      Ramamurthy, T. “Engineering in Rocks for Slopes, Foundation and Tunnels”, Prentice Hall India Pvt. Ltd., 2007

 

 

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CE-321 Estimation and Materials Testing Laboratory

Tension Test on Tor-Steel (IS 1786), Testing of Tiles (Wet Transverse strength, Water absorption test)(IS 1237), Testing of Bricks ( Compressive strength, Water Absorption, Efflorescence) (IS 3495- Part 1,2,3), Compression Test on Plain Concrete Cube & Cylinder  (IS 516), Ultrasonic Test on Concrete Cube (IS 13311 Part 1), Schmitz Rebound Hammer Test (NDT) on Concrete Cube (IS 13311 Part 2), Water Permeability Test for concrete ( IS  3085)Consistency Test on Cement  (IS 4031 Part 4), Initial and Final setting time of Cement (IS 4031 Part 5), Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar Cube (IS 4031 Part 6), Effect of chemical admixtures on Fresh Concrete Properties (IS 9103, IS 1199, IS 8142), Slump, Slump retention, Setting time of concrete (with and without superplasticizers), Estimation of quantities and costing.

References:

1.      IS 1786 (1985 – reaffirmed 1990) Specification for high strength deformed steel bars and wires for reinforcement, Indian Standards.

2.      IS 1237 (1980- reaffirmed 1996)Specification for cement concrete flooring tiles, Indian Standards.

3.      IS 3495- Part 1,2,3 (1992- reaffirmed 2002) Methods of tests of burnt clay building bricks, Indian Standards.

4.      IS 516 (1959- reaffirmed 1999) Methods of tests forstrength of concrete, Indian Standards.

5.      IS 13311 - Part 1 & 2 (1992- reaffirmed 2004) Non-destructive testing of concrete - Methods of test, Indian Standards.

6.      IS 3085 (1965-reaffirmed 1997) Method of test forpermeability of cement mortarand concrete, Indian Standards.

7.      IS 4031 - Part 4, 5 & 6 (1988-reaffirmed 2005) Methods of physical tests forhydraulic cement, Indian Standards.

8.      IS 9103 (1999- reaffirmed 2004) Concrete admixtures – Specification, Indian Standards.

9.      IS 1199 (1959- reaffirmed 1999) Methods of sampling andanalysis of concrete, Indian Standards.

10.   IS 8142 (1976 –reaffirmed 2002) Method of test for determining setting time of concrete bypenetration resistance, Indian Standards.

11.   Dutta, B. N. Estimating and Costing in Civil Engineering- Theory and Practice, 27th revised edition, UBS publishers` Distributors Pvt. Ltd., India, 2013.

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ES-3XX[2] Applied Geology for Civil Engineers

Classification of rock forming minerals and rocks; Igneous rocks, types, characters and properties; Metamorphism and its types, structures, textures and effect on practical properties; Sedimentary environment, structure, textural classification of silici-clastic and carbonate rocks; Weathering process, transportation and sedimentation process; Geological action – wind, water, ocean, glaciers ( landforms); Seismic zones of India; Earth structure- Fold, Fault, Joints and Shear zones; Geological and Geophysical investigations for site classification; Concept of stresses and strain in rocks; Different failure criteria in rocks and rock masses; Engineering properties and strength of rocks; Rock mass classification (RQD, RMR, GSI,RMi); Rock breakage mechanism and safety of civil structures; Geological consideration for the design of Dams, tunnels, bridges and other civil works; Slope stability and stabilization methods; Case studies

Practical classes: Identification of common minerals and rock specimens; Measurement of shear strength of rocks; Determination of compressive and tensile strengths of rocks using UTM; Calculation of the deformability characteristic of rocks (elastic, bulk, shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio); Estimation of index properties of rocks (point load strength, slake durability, sonic wave velocity and specific gravity).

References:

1.      Parthasarathy, A., Panchapakesan, V. and Nagarajan, R. "Engineering Geology", Wiley India Pvt Ltd., 2013.  ISBN-13: 9788126541829

2.      Reddy, D. V. "Engineering Geology", Vikas Publishing House, 2010. ISBN13: 9788125919032

3.      Goodman, R. E. "Introduction to Rock Mechanics", Wiley India Pvt Ltd, 1989. ISBN10: 8126525665

4.      Bieniawski, Z. T. "Engineering Rock Mass Classifications: A Complete Manual for Engineers and Geologists in Mining, Civil, and Petroleum Engineering", Wiley-Blackwell, 1989. ISBN-10: 0471601721

5.      Goel, R. and Singh, B. "Engineering Rock Mass Classification: Tunneling, Foundations and Landslides", Elsevier, 2011. ISBN-10: 012385878X

6.      Krynine, D.P. and Judd, W.R. "Principles of Engineering Geology and Geotechnics", CBS Publishers & Distributors, New Delhi, 1957.  ISBN-10: 812390603X.

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            Course Structure (B. Tech.) - Fourth Year

First Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 401

Water Resources Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 463

Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 407

Foundation Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 4XX

Departmental Elective I

6

Departmental Elective including BTP

CE 4XX

Departmental Elective II

6

Departmental Elective including BTP

 

Institute Elective II

6

Institute Elective

Total Credits

36

 

 

Second Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 4XX

Department Elective III

6

Departmental Electives including BTP

CE 4XX

Department Elective IV

6

CE 4XX

Department Elective V

6

CE 4XX

Department Elective VI

6

Total Credits

24

 

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List of Departmental Electives

Course Code

Course Title

Credits

CE 324

Engineering Law

6

CE 402

Introduction to Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering

6

CE 403

Design of Structures III

6

CE 410

Introduction to Offshore Engineering

6

CE 418

Introduction to Finite Elements Methods

6

CE 419

Physical Modelling in Geotechnics

6

CE 429

Urban Hydrology and Drainage Systems

6

CE 434

Traffic Analysis and Design

6

CE 442

Machine Foundations

6

CE 448

Pre-stressed Concrete Design

6

CE 462

Elements of Structural Dynamics

6

CE 465

Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

6

CE 469

Advanced Solid Mechanics

6

CE 478

Plastic Analysis and Design

6

CE 480

Computer Aided Design in Civil Engineering

6

CE 482

Construction Management

6

CE 488

Environmental Geotechnics

6

CE 490

Elements of Remote Sensing.

6

CE 492

Reinforced Earth

6

CE 494

BTP-I

6

CE 495

BTP-II

6

CE 496

Irrigation Engineering and Technology

6

CE 484

Concrete Technology

6

CE 620

Advanced Finite Element Methods

6

CE 422

Hydraulic Structures

6

CE 424

Groundwater Hydrology

6

CE 676

Water Resources System

6

 


 

CE-401 Water Resources Engineering

Rainfall and runoff, hydrograph analysis, peaks flows. Reservoir planning and operation, run-of the river schemes, storage schemes. Dams and spillways, intakes, water-conductory systems, tunnels, surge-tanks, penstocks and anchor blocks. Hydro-electric power classification and investigations. Turbines, power house, irrigation, crop requirements and yields, water planning. Weirs on permeable foundations. Canals layout, stable channels, and silt control, canal losses and water-logging.

References:

1.      R.K. Linsley and J.L.H. Paulhus: Water Resources Engineering, Mcgraw Hill Book Co., 1992.

2.      W.P. Creager and J.D. Justin: Hydroelectric Handbook John Wiley, 1968.

3.      Bharat Singh: Fundamentals of Irrigation Engineering Nemchand Bros., Roorkee, 1957.

4.      P.N. Modi, Irrigation Water Resources and Water Power Engineering Standard Book House, NEw Delhi, 1990.

 

 

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Back to Dual Degree Course Structure


 

CE-463 Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

Role of probability in Civil Engineering; Random events, random variables; Functions of random variables; Moments and expectations; Common probabilistic models – normal, lognormal, Poisson, extermal; Estimation of parameters; Goodness of fit test; Regression and correlation analyses, introduction to structural reliability, FORM; Elements of quality assurance and acceptance sampling.

References:

1.      H.S. Ang and W.H. Tang, Probability Concepts in Engineering Planning and Design, Wiley, New York, 1975.

2.      J.R. Benjamin and C.A. Cornell, Probability Statistics and Decision for Civil Engineers, McGraw Hill, New York, 1975.

3.      R. Ranganathan, Reliability Analysis and Design of Structures, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1990.

 

 

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CE-407 Foundation Engineering

Site investigations- spacing/depth of boreholes, disturbed/undisturbed soil sampling, geophysical exploration, electrical resistivity method, preparation of borhole logs and final report. Shallow foundations- theories of bearing capacity, standard penetration test, design of a footing in cohesionless/cohesive soil based on settlement and bearing capacity criteria, plate load test, combined footings, eccentrically loaded footings. Analysis and design of raft based on settlement and bearing capacity criteria. Retaining walls - various types, size proportioning and stability analysis. Pile foundations- driven piles in cohesive/cohesionless soil, bearing capacity/settlement aspects, analysis and design of pile groups, bored cast-in-situ piles, pile driving equipment. Ground improvement- sand drains and surcharging.

References:

1.      A. Singh, Modern Geotechnical Engineering, 3rd Ed., CBS Publishers, New Delhi, 1999.

2.      B.M. Das, Principles of Foundation Engineering, 5th Ed., Thomson Asia, Singapore, 2003.

3.      N. Som, Theory and Practice of Foundation Design, Prentice Hall, New Delhi, 2003.

 

 

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CE-324 Engineering Law

The Indian legal system from an engineer’s perspective. Socratic-method analysis of statutory and case law. Contract, patent, corporation, antitrust, property, and environmental laws. Development of law, courts, and ethics; law on contracts, agency, sales, property, and patterns; specifications; preparation of contract documents. Coverage of following topics: 1. Overview of Indian legal system, 2. Contracts: Definitions and essentials, 3. Conditions: 3rd parties and law, 4. Construction: Performance/Breach/Damages and Contracts, 5. General Conditions: Proposals, advertisements and applications, 6. Financial Considerations: Loans and leans, 7. Specifications: Workmanship, material, drawings, 8. Agencies: Partnerships and corporations, 9. Torts: Limited coverage, 10. Professional liability: Insurance, bonds, property, 11. Litigation: Evidence, expert witness, mediation, ethics.

References:

1.      Judgements and case studies.

 

 

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CE-403 Design of Structures III

Design of RCC watertanks, silos, bunkers and simple bridges - Design of steel roof trusses, steel frames - Design of industrial buildings - Design of residential buildings - Design of arches and shells.

References:

1.      J. Krishna and O.P. Jain, Plain and Reinforced Concrete, Vol. I and II Nemchand Bros. Roorkee, 1968.

2.      IS 456, 1978. Code of Practice for Plain and Reinforced concrete.

3.      Design Aids for R.C. to IS 456-1978, ISI-SP-16-sand-T, 1980.

4.      A.S. Arya and J.L. Ajmani : Design of Steel Structures, Nemchand Bros. Roorkee, 1990.

5.      A.S. Arya and J.L. Ajmani : Design of Steel Structures, Nemchand Bros. Roorkee, 1990.

6.       S.M.A. Kazimi and R.S. Jindal - `Design of Steel Structures, Prentice Hall (India), New Delhi, 1981.

7.      S.K. Duggal - `Design of Steel Structures, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1993.

8.      P. Dayaratnam - `Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures, Third Edition, Oxford - IBM Publishing Co., New Delhi, 1989.

9.      S.N. Sinha - `Reinforced Concrete Design, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1990.

 

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CE-410 Introduction to Offshore Engineering

Offshore environment, types of structures; Wave theories - linear and nonlinear; Wave induced forces - on fixed and floating structures; Stability of floating structures; Submarine pipelines; Offshore construction - installation, repairs, maintenance and operation.

References:

1.      C.A. Brebbla and S. Walker, Dynamic analysis of Offshore Structures, Newnes Butterworth, London, 1979.

2.      T. Sarapkaya and M. Isaacson, Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1981.

3.      B.C. Gerwick, Offshore Construction, Buttersworth, 2000. S. Narasimhan, S Kathiroli and T Nagendrakumar, Harbor and Coastal Engineering, National Institute of Ocean Technology, Chennai, 2001.

 

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CE-418 Introduction to Finite Elements Methods

Introduction - Overview of different methods, background of finite element method, general steps, advantages and disadvantages; One-dimensional analysis - Linear spring, truss, beam, plane frame, grid, torsion, steady state heat conduction, flow through porous media, flow through pipes; Two-dimensional analysis - two dimensional flow through porous media, stress analysis, review of theory of elasticity, plane stress analysis, plane strain analysis, axisymmetric analysis, isoparametric formulation, numerical integration; Computer implementation of finite element method - solution of large set of equations, use of symmetry and anti-symmetry conditions, sub-structuring, application of boundary conditions.

References:

1.      T.R. Chandrupatla and A.D. Belegundu, Introduction to Finite Elements in Engineering, 3rd Ed., Prentice-Hall, New Delhi, 2002.

2.      J.N. Reddy, Introduction to the Finite Element Method, 2nd Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2005.

3.      C.S. Krishnamoorthy, Finite Element Analysis: Theory and Programming, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1987.

4.      O.C. Zienkiewicz, R.L. Taylor and J.Z. Zhu, Finite Element Method: Its Basis and Fundamentals, 6th Ed., Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford, 2005.

5.      Finite Element Method with Applications in Engineering by Y. M. Desai, T. I. Eldho and A. H. Shah, Pearson, 2011.

 

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CE-419 Physical modelling in Geotechnics

 

References:

1.       

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CE-402 Introduction to Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering

 

References:

1.       

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CE-429 Urban Hydrology and Drainage Systems

 

References:

1.       

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CE-434 Traffic Analysis and Design

Introduction and scope; Traffic stream components and characteristics; Theoretical techniques for describing traffic flow; Traffic studies and analysis of traffic data; Highway capacity, level of service and performance characteristics; Planning and design of facilities; Simulation in traffic engineering; Traffic forecasting principles and techniques.

References:

1.      R.P. Roess, E.S. Prassas and W.R. McShane, Traffic Engineering, 3rd Ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2004.

2.      Highway Capacity Manual, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2000.

3.      C.F. Daganzo, Fundamentals of Transportation and Traffic Operations. Pergamon, New York. 1997.

4.      M. Wohl, and B.V. Martin, Traffic System Analysis for Engineers and Planners. McGraw Hill, 1983.

5.      D.R. Drew, Traffic Flow Theory, McGraw Hill, New York, 1964

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CE-442 Machine Foundations

 

References:

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CE-448 Pre-stressed Concrete Design

Prestressing concepts, materials, systems of prestressing and losses. Introduction to working stress method, limit state analysis and design of members for bending. Shear torsion and axial forces. End block design. Deflections, use of relevant codes of practice.

References:

1.      T.Y. Lin and N.H. Burns, Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures, 3rd Ed., Wiley, New York, 1981.

2.      A.E. Naaman, Prestressed Concrete Analysis and Design: Fundamentals, 2nd Ed., Technopress, New York, 2004.

3.      N. Krishnaraju, Prestressed Concrete, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1981.

4.      Y. Guyan, Limit State Design of Prestressed Concrete, Applied Science Publishers, 1972

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CE-462 Elements of Structural Dynamics

 

References:

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CE-465 Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

Programming fundamentals; Fundamentals of numerical methods; Error analysis; Curve fitting; Interpolation and extrapolation; Differentiation and integration; Solution of nonlinear algebraic and transcendental equations; Elements of matrix algebra; Solution of systems of linear equations; Eigenvalue problems; Solution of differential equations. Computer oriented algorithms; Numerical solution of different problems

References:

1.      J. H. Wilkinson, The Algebraic Eigenvalue Problem, Oxford University Press, London, 1965.

2.      K.E. Atkinson, An Introduction to Numerical Analysis, Wiley, New York, 1989.

3.      G. E. Golub and C.F. Van Loan, Matrix Computations, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 1989.

4.      W.H. Press, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterling, B.P. Flannery (Eds.), Numerical Recipes in C: The Art of Scientific Computing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1993.

5.      W.H. Press, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterling, B.P. Flannery (Eds.), Numerical Recipes in Fortran: The Art of Scientific Computing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1992.

6.      B.N. Datta, Numerical Linear Algebra and Applications, Brookes/Cole Publishing Company, Pacific Grove, California, 1995.

7.      J.D. Hoffman, Numerical Methods for Engineers and Scientists, Marcel Dekker, New York, 2001.

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CE-469 Advanced Solid Mechanics

Elasticity fundamentals: Stress and Strain; Constitutive, compatibility, and equilibrium equations, boundary conditions; Types of boundary value problems; Plane stress and plane strain, 2-D problems in rectangular, polar, and curvilinear coordinates; Elementary 3-D problems; Torsion of non-circular members; Unsymmetrical bending of straight beams, shear center; Curved beams. Beams on elastic foundation; Thermal stresses; Energy methods: Castiglianos theorems, statically indeterminate structures; Introduction to Viscoelasticity; Introduction to plasticity, failure theories, formulation for elasto-plastic problems; Numerical techniques.

References:

1.      A.C. Ugural and S. K. Fenster, Advanced Strength and Applied Elasticity, Prentice-Hall, New York, 1995.

2.      A.P. Boresi and O. M. Sidebottom, Advanced Mechanics of Materials, 5th Ed., Wiley, Singapore, 1992.

3.      C.R. Calladine, Plasticity for Engineers - Theory and Applications, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, 2000.

4.      I.S. Sokolnikoff, Mathematical Theory of Elasticity, McGraw Hill, New York, 1956.

5.      L.S. Srinath, Advanced Mechanics of Solids, 2nd Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2003.

6.      S.P. Timoshenko and J. N. Goodier, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd Ed., McGraw Hill, Tokyo, 1970

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CE-478 Plastic Analysis and Design

 

References:

7.       

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CE-480 Computer Aided Design in Civil Engineering

 

References:

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CE-482 Construction Management

Fundamentals of construction project management: Introduction, Project Initiation and Planning, Time Value of Money, Investment Analysis, Cost-Benefit Analysis; Construction schedule management: Work Breakdown Structures, Development of project activity networks, Precedence Diagram Method, Critical Path Method (CPM), Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), Line Balance Methods in scheduling; Construction material management: Resources in construction, Resource levelling, crashing of project schedules, earned value analysis; Construction Quality and safety: Safety and occupational hazards in construction, Fundamentals of quality control in construction; Introduction to Construction Contracts: Contracts in construction, fundamentals of delay analysis and claims; Advances in construction management: Introduction to Building Information Modelling (BIM), Lean construction, and Integrated Project Delivery in construction.

References:

1.      Bennett, F. Lawrence., The management of construction: a project life cycle approach. Routledge, 2003.

2.      Oberlender, Garold D., Project management for engineering and construction. Vol. 2. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993.

3.      Peurifoy, Robert Leroy, Cliff J. Schexnayder and Shapira A.. Construction planning, equipment, and methods. No. 696 pp. McGraw-Hill, 2010.

4.      Riggs, James L., David D. Bedworth, and Sabah U. Randhawa., Engineering economics. 4th Ed., McGraw-Hill, 2004.

5.      Jha, Kumar Neeraj. Construction project management: theory and practice. Pearson Education India, 2011.

6.      Chitkara, K. K. Construction Project Management. Tata McGraw-Hill Education, 2014.

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CE-488 Environmental Geotechnics

Hazardous wastes, Physical, Chemical and Mineralogical characterization, Geoenvironmental hazards: Natural and man made, Recycle and Reuse of Industrial waste(s). Role of Geotechnical engineering in environmental protection, Surface and subsurface contamination, Characterization of contaminated ground, Geoenvironmental site investigation and site assessment technologies

References:

1.      Y B Acar and D E Daniel, Geoenvironmental 2000: Characterization, Containment, Remediation & Performance in Environmental Geotechnics, ASCE, NY. 2000.

2.      D S Hari and R R Krishna, Geoenvironmental Engineering: Site Remediation, Waste Containment, and Emerging Waste Management Technologies, Wiley, 2005.

3.      I S Oweis and R P Khera, Geotechnology of Waste Management, 2nd Ed, PSW Publishing,. 2004.

4.      J F Rees, Contaminated Land Treatment Technologies, Elsevier Applied Science, NY, 1992

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CE-490 Elements of Remote Sensing

 

References:

5.       

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CE-492 Reinforced Earth

Introduction, polymer materials, overview of geotextiles, geogrids, geonets, geomembranes, geocomposites. geocells, geojutes, geocoir, geocontainers, geobags, geotubes, geosynthetic clay liners and geofoams, design methods, geosynthetic properties and test method, geosynthetic functions, designing for geosynthetic reinforced soil walls, embankments on soft soils, steep slopes, roadway, asphalt overlay, filtration, drainage, erosion control, landfill liners, prefabricated vertical drains and bearing capacity

References:

1.      R.M. Koerner, Designing with Geosynthetic, 5th Ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2005.

2.      P.H. Delmas, J.P. Gourc and A. Girard (Editors), Geosynthetics State of the Art Recent Developments, Vol.1,2 & 3, A.A. Balkema Publishers, Netherlands, 2002.

3.      J.N. Mandal and D. Choudhury (Editors), International Conference on Geosynthetics and Geoenvironmental Engineering, Quest Publications, Mumbai, 2004.

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CE-496 Irrigation engineering and Technology

 

References:

1.       

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CE-484 Concrete Technology

Cements, aggregates, water. Fresh concrete. Workability, consolidation and curing. Strength, elasticity, shrinkage and creep of concrete. Concrete mix-design. Destructive and non-destructive testing of hardened concrete, admixtures. Lightweight concrete. High density concrete (for nuclear shielding). Hot-weather and cold weather concreting. Quality control. Durability of concrete. Corrosion and protection of concrete. Polymer concrete

References:

1.      F.M. Lue, Chemistry of Cement and Concrete, Edward Arnold, 3rd Edition, 1970.

2.      A.M. Neville, Properties of Concrete, Pitman, 1968.

3.      D.F. Orchardi, Concrete Technology, John Wiley, 1992.

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CE-620 Advanced Finite Element Methods

Principles of discretisation; Element stiffness mass formulation based on direct, variational and weighted residual techniques and displacements, hybrid stress and mixed approaches, shape functions and numerical integrations, convergence, Displacement formulations for rectangular, triangular and isoparametric elements for two dimensional and axisymmetric stress analysis; Thin and Thick plates and shells, Semi-analytical formulations; Three dimensional elements and degenerated forms; Stiffener elements and modifications such as use of different coordinate systems, use of nonconforming modes and penalty functions; Application to layered composite plate/shells, bridge, roof, nuclear and offshore structures; Hybrid stress and mixed formulations for plates

References:

1.      O.C. Zienkiewicz, The Finite Element Method, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1977.

2.      K. J. Bathe, Finite Element Procedures, Prentice Hall, New York, 1995.

3.      Finite Element Method with Applications in Engineering by Y. M. Desai, T. I. Eldho and A. H. Shah, Pearson, 2011

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CE-422 Hydraulic Structures

 

References:

4.       

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CE-424 Groundwater Hydrology

 

References:

5.       

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CE-676 Water Resources Systems

Objective of water resources development, Economic analysis and discounting techniques, Conditions of project optimality, Graphic optimization techniques for multipurpose projects, Analytical optimization techniques for water resources projects by linear programming, Nonlinear programming and Dynamic programming. Optimization by simulation, Mathematical models for large-scale multipurpose projects, Different case studies. Stochastic optimization techniques, Water quality subsystems, Optimum operation models for reservoir systems by incremental dynamic programming, Sequencing of multipurpose project. Economics of planning and decision making of water resources projects. Flood, Waterpower, Irrigation and Drainage. Introduction to artificial neural network and genetic algorithm. Applications in water resources.

References:

1.      W.A. Hall, and J.A. Dracup, Water Resources Systems Engineering, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1970.

2.      L.D. James, and R.R. Lee, Economics of Water Resources Planning, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1971.

3.      D.P. Louck, J.R. Stedinger, and D.A. Haith, Water Resources Systems, Planning and Analysis, Prentice Hall, London, 1981.

4.      A.K. Biswas, System Approach to Water Management, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1976.

5.      L. Votruba, Analysis of Water Resources Systems, Elsevier, London, 1988.

6.      J.E. Dayoff, Neural Networks Architecture: An Introduction, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1990.

7.      D.E. Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization and Machine Learning, Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, 1989.

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Dual Degree (B.Tech. + M.Tech.) In Civil Engineering

CE-1: Transportation Engineering

Course Structure - Fourth Year

 

1st Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 401

Water Resources Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 463

Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 465

Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

2

1

0

6

Core Course

  CE 407

Foundation Engineering

 3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 4xx*

Departmental UG Elective I (PG Elective I)

6

Departmental UG Electives

CE 740

CE 751

Traffic Engineering OR

Urban Transportation Systems Planning

8

PG Core

CE 753

Transportation Systems Studio

4

PG Laboratory course

Total Credits

42

 

CE 4xx* must be from List of CE-1 PG Electives

 

Fourth Year –2nd Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 742

Pavement Systems Engineering

8

PG Core

CX xxx

PG Elective II

6

         PG Elective

CE 694

Credit seminar

4

Seminar

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective II

6

 

Departmental UG Electives

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective III

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective IV

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective V

      6

Total Credits

42

 

 

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CE-740 Traffic Engineering

Traffic stream characteristics: Road user and vehicle characteristics, Fundamental parameters and relations, Traffic Stream Models, Modeling vehicle arrivals: Continuous distributions to model Headways and speed, Modeling vehicle arrivals: Discrete distributions to model flow and evaluation of distributions. Traffic measurement procedures: Measurement at a Point (Volume data collection and analysis, PCU, PHF etc), Measurement over a Short Section (Speed data collection and analysis), Measurement along a Length of Road (Density and travel time measurement and analysis), Moving Observer Method, Traffic forecasting and growth studies. Microscopic traffic flow modeling: Car Following Models: Linear models, Car Following Models: Non-linear models, Lane Changing Models, Microscopic Traffic Simulation (Vehicle generation, model frame work, calibration and validations, statistical error analysis, applications). Macroscopic and mesocopic models: Traffic Flow Modeling Analogies: First order models, analysis of shock waves, Traffic Flow Modeling Analogies: Numerical implementation and higher order models, Cell transmission models, Cellular automata models: Discrete Simulation , Traffic Progression and Platoon dispersion. Traffic Analysis and Management: Capacity and Level of Service concepts, Queuing models and applications, Basics of traffic management. Traffic intersection control: Principles of Traffic Control and Traffic Signs, Road Markings and Channelization, Uncontrolled Intersection: Gap acceptance and capacity concepts, Uncontrolled Intersection: Capacity and LOS analysis, Traffic Rotaries and Grade Separated Intersection. Traffic signal design: Design Principles of Traffic Signal, Evaluation of a Traffic Signal: Delay Models, Capacity and LOS Analysis of a Signalized I/S, Coordinated Traffic Signal, Vehicle Actuated Signals and Area Traffic Control.

References:

1.      Adolf D. May. Fundamentals of Traffic Flow. Prentice - Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliff New Jersey 07632, second edition, 1990.

2.      William R McShane, Roger P Roesss, and Elena S Prassas. Traffic Engineering. Prentice-Hall, Inc, 2010.

3.      C. S. Papacostas and P. D. Prevedouros. Fundamentals of Transportation Engineering. Prentice-Hall, New Delhi, 2009.

4.      C. Jotin Khisty, B. Kent Lall, Transportation Engineering: An Introduction, Prentice Hall, 2003.

5.      Nicholas J. Garber, Lester A. Hoel, Traffic and Highway Engineering, Cengage Learning, 2008.

6.      L. R Kadiyali. Traffic Engineering and Transportation Planning. Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 2008.

7.      D R Drew. Traffic flow theory and control. McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1968.

8.      Highway Capacity Manual. Transportation Research Board. National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2010.

9.      Fred L. Mannering, Scott S. Washburn and Walter P. Kilareski, Principles of Highway Engineering and Traffic Analysis, Wiley India, 2011.

10.   A. S. Narasimha Murthy and Henry R. Mohle. Transportation Engineering Basics, ASCE Press, USA. 2001.

11.   Thomas R. Currin, Introductions to Traffic Engineering: A Manual for Data Collection and Analysis, Brooks/Cole Thomason Learning, Canada, 2001.

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CE-751 Urban Transportation Systems Planning

Introduction and scope; Definition and basic principles; Transportation problems; Types of models; Planning methodologies; Conventional transportation planning process; Travel demand modeling and forecasting; Trip generation - regression, category analysis; Trip distribution - growth factor, Fratar and Furness methods, calibration of Gravity model, intervening opportunities model, competing opportunities model, LP model; Modal split models - aggregate and disaggregate models, discriminant, logit and probit analysis; Traffic Assignment - route building, capacity restraint, multipath, incremental and equilibrium assignment; Graph theory applications in transport network analysis; Urban goods movement; Land use - transport models: historical development, case studies, ISGLUTI Study, recent developments. Laboratory Component: Solving case study problems in travel demand modeling with the help of transportation planning and econometric packages. Developing computer programs for the calibration of travel demand, land-use and land use-transport models.

References:

1.      Hutchinson, B.G., Principles of Urban Transport Systems Planning, McGraw Hill, New York, 1974.

2.      Ortuzar, J. and Willumsen, L.G., Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chinchestor, 1994.

3.      Oppenheim, N., Urban Travel Demand Modeling: From Individual Choices to General Equilibrium, Wiley, New York, 1995.

4.      Thomas, R., Traffic Assignment Techniques, Avebury Technical, Aldershot, 1991.

5.      Taniguchi, E., Thompson, R.G., Yamada, T. and Van Duin, R., City Logistics - Network Modelling and Intelligent Transport Systems, Elsevier, Pergamon, Oxford, 2001.

6.      Bruton, M.J., Introduction to Transportation Planning, Hutchinson, London, 1985.

7.      Dickey, J.W., Metropolitan Transportation Planning, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1975.

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CE-753 Traffic Design and Studio

LaTex – A Document preparation system: Latex, XFig, Gnuplot. A Project on type setting a technical document in Latex, C Programming: Basics, file read and out, arrays and matrices, pointers, linked list, dynamic memory, Sample programs, running large programs. Design of Traffic Facilities: Plan and layout of major at-grade and grade-separated interactions; Parking lot and multi-storied parking garages; Pedestrian facilities.  Simulating Traffic Flow: Application software VISSIM. Road network inventory. Design and coding of transportation planning surveys. GIS application in spatial data handling.

References:

1.      William R McShane, Roger P Roesss, and Elena S Prassas. Traffic Engineering. Prentice-Hall, Inc, 2010.

2.      C. S. Papacostas and P. D. Prevedouros. Fundamentals of Transportation Engineering. Prentice-Hall, New Delhi, 2009.

3.      C. Jotin Khisty, B. Kent Lall, Transportation Engineering: An Introduction, Prentice Hall, 2003.

4.      Highway Capacity Manual. Transportation Research Board. National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2010.

5.      Thomas R. Currin, Introductions to Traffic Engineering: A Manual for Data Collection and Analysis, Brooks/Cole Thomason Learning, Canada, 2001.

6.      Banks J., J. S. Carson and B. L. Nelson. Discrete-Event System Simulation, Fifth edition. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 2010.

7.      Harry H. Cheng , C for Engineers and Scientists, McGraw Hill, 2010.

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CE-742 Pavement Systems Engineering

Historical development of pavements. Introduction to different types of flexible pavements and design factors, Stress and strain analysis of flexible pavements. Introduction to multi-layers elastic theory. Analysis of pavements using software such as IITPAVE and KENPAVE, Stress and strain (deflection) analysis of rigid pavements. Analysis of pavements using software such as IITRIGID and KENLAYER, and others. Introduction to traffic loading, Understanding the concept of equivalent standard axle load (ESAL),

Design of flexible pavements as per IRC 37, AASHTO, and AI methods for stabilized and un-stabilized base and subgrade layers. Design of rigid pavements as per IRC 58, AASHTO, and PCA methods for stabilized and un-stabilized base and subgrade layers. Introduction to different types of overlays on flexible and rigid pavements (PCC over HMA, HMA over PCC, HMA over HMA, PCC over PCC) and their design philosophy.

Introduction to Benkelman Beam method and design of HMA overlay as per IRC 81. Introduction to white-topping (conventional, thin, ultra-thin) and their design as per IRC:SP-76-2008.  Introduction to drainage requirement for pavements. Pavement performance evaluation and distresses. Data requirement and database development. Different types of rehabilitation and maintenance strategies. Construction practices for building flexible and rigid pavements. The laboratory components will cover various experiment on different types of pavement materials namely,  proctor, CBR, Brookfield viscosity, Mix design.

References:

1.      Y.H. Huang “Pavement Analysis and Design,” 2nd Edition, 2004, Pearson Prentice Hall, USA

2.      N. Delatte “Concrete Pavement Design, Construction, and Performance” Taylor and Francis

3.      MORT&H- Specifications for Roads and Bridges, 5th Revision, 2013.

4.      IRC: 37-2012. “Tentative Guidelines for the Design of Flexible Pavements,” Indian Road Congress, Delhi.

5.      IRC: 58-2011. “Tentative Guidelines for the Design of Rigid Pavements,” Indian Road Congress, Delhi.

6.      IRC: 81-2012. “Guidelines for Strengthening of Flexible Road Pavements Using Benkelman Beam Deflection Technique,” Indian Road Congress, Delhi

7.      IRC: SP: 76-2008. “Tentative Guidelines for Conventional, Thin and Ultra-Thin White-topping,” Indian Road Congress, Delhi.

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Course Structure – Fifth Year

 

Fifth Year –1st Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 740

CE 751

Traffic Engineering OR

Urban Transportation Systems Planning

8

PG Core

CE xxx

PG Elective III

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

DDP-I

36

 

Total Credits

50

 

 

 

 

Fifth Year –2nd Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE xxx

PG Elective IV

6

PG  Elective

CE xxx

PG Elective V

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

DDP-II

36

 

Total Credits

48

 

 


 

List of CE-1 PG Electives

 

Course Code

Course Title

CE-604

Applied Statistics

CE-630

Geographical Information Systems in Civil Engineering

CE-744

Analysis of Transportation Systems

CE-780

Behavioural Travel Modelling

CE-6xx

Optimization in Civil Engineering

CE-7xx

Pavement Materials

CE-7xx

Highway Design and Analysis

CE-7xx

Traffic Management and Design

CE-7xx

Transportation project evaluation and decision making

CE-7xx

Airport planning and design

 


 

CE-604 Applied Statistics

Introduction to Probability and Random Variables: Probability Space; Axioms of Probability; Joint Probability; Conditional probability; Independence; Baye’s Rule; Sequential Continuity; Union of Events; Numerical examples; Random Variable (RV): Definition, Notation and Inverse Image; Discrete and Continuous Random variables. Probability Distribution: Cumulative Distribution Function; Distribution Function of Indicator RV; Probability Density Function; Probability Mass Function; Examples of Probability Mass Function: Bernoulli Trials, Binomial Distribution, Hypergeometric Distribution, Negative Binomial Distribution, Poisson’s Distribution, Geometric Distribution; Examples of Probability Density Function: Uniform Distribution, Gamma Distribution, Erlang Distribution, Exponential Distribution, Rayleigh Distribution, Laplace Distribution, Gaussian Distribution, Lognormal Distribution and Extreme Value Distribution; Generation of RV, Probability Plotting, Fitting a Distribution, Nonparametric pdf. Conditional and Joint Distribution Function: Conditional CDF, Joint Distribution Function, Marginal Distribution Function; Condtional Distribution and Independence; Gaussian Random vector. Function of RV: Function of a RV; Monotonically Increasing and Decreasing Functions; Function of Jointly Distributed RVs; Function of iid RVs.

Moments: Moments of a RV; Joint Central Moments; Covariance Matrix; Correlation Co-efficient; Ecological Correlation; Moment Generating Function; Probability Generating Function; Characteristic Function; Moment Inequalities, Central Limit Theorem.

Linear Regression: Linear Regression, Hypothesis Testing, Multiple Regression Analysis, Dummy Variable Regression Analysis, Assumptions of Regression: Multicollinearity, Heteroscedasity, Autocorrelation among Residuals; Introduction to SPSSMultivariate Statistics, Principal Component Analysis, Introduction to Clustering.Introduction to Stochastic Process

References:

1.      Gujarati, Basic Econometrics, Mc Grawhill.

2.      Hoel, Port and Stone, Introduction to Probability Theory, Universal Book Stall.

3.      Papoulis, A. and Pillai, S. U., Probability, Random Variables and Stochastic Processes, Tata Mc-Grawhill.

4.      Stark and Woods, Probability and Random Processes with Applications to Signal Processing, Pearson Education.

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CE-630 Geographical Information Systems in Civil Engineering

Introduction - Geographical concepts  and  terminology - Difference  between image processing system, other information systems and GIS - utility of GIS - Various GIS packages and their salient features - Essential components of GIS.

Data: Spatial and Non-Spatial Data – Spatial Data: Points, Lines, Polygons/Area and Surface - Non-Spatial Data - Levels of Measurement: Nominal, Ordinal, Interval, Ratio – Data Base – Functions - Data Base Structures – Hierarchical, Network, Relational- Relational Data Base Management System – Normalization, E-R Diagram- data manipulation and analysis.

Data acquisition - Raster data model- Introduction, Description, Data Compression-run length, chain, block and quadtree coding - Vector Data Model – Topology, Euler equation, Rules for topological consistency – arc-node data structure - Raster to vector conversion - Topology and spatial relationships - Data storage verification and editing - Raster vs. vector comparison

Coordinate systems – Datums - Map projections - Coordinate transformation – Georeferencing – Ditigization- Methods of digitization, Common errors in digitization

Discrete and continuous surfaces – Interpolation techniques - Digital elevation models – sources of DEM – DEM representation – Gridded DEM, TIN structure – Extraction of topographic parameters: slope, aspect, delineation of watershed and drainage network - DEM applications.

Spatial   and   mathematical   operations   in   GIS - Overlay,   Query   based measurement and statistical modelling, Buffers, Spatial analysis, Network analysis, Statistical reporting and graphing - Application of GIS to various natural resources mapping and monitoring and other civil engineering related problems

References:

1.      Burrough P.A. and McDonnell R.A., “Principles of Geographical Information Systems”, Oxford University Press, 2006.

2.      Ian Heywood Sarah, Cornelius and Steve Carver, “An Introduction to Geographical Information Systems”. 3rd Edition, Pearson Education. New Delhi, 2006.

3.      Michael Worboys and Matt Duckham, GIS: A Computing Perspective -2nd edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2004.

4.      Lo, C.P. and Yeung, Albert K.W., Concepts and Techniques of Geographic Information Systems Prentice Hall, 2002.

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CE-744 Analysis of Transportation Systems

Introduction: transportation systems, transportation innovations, social and economic impacts of transportation, Decision makers and their options, demand modelling and predictions, Modelling transportation systems. Analysis of network flows: Shortest-Path Problems, Maximum-flow Problems, Minimum-cost network flow problems, Minimum Spanning tree problem, The network simplex method

Static Traffic Assignment:  All-or-nothing (AON) assignment, Link cost function, Equilibrium principles: User Equilibrium (UE) and System Optimal (SO), Formulations of SO and UE, Uniqueness of UE and SO formulations, multi-mode traffic assignment, Variable Demand assignment, Stochastic Traffic Assignment, Solution of traffic assignment problems.

Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA): Introduction, Point queue model, Cell Transmission Model, Whole link model, Dynamic user equilibrium (DUE), Analytical Models of DUE, Solution of DUE formulations, Simulation based DUE. Public Transportation Systems: Transit Assignment, Transit route network planning, performance monitoring, vehicle and crew scheduling. Decision Making in Transportation Networks: Congestion pricing, network design problems, prioritizing investment

Optional Topics: Integrated land-use and transport modelling, Activity based travel demand modelling, Entropy in the analysis of utility maximizing systems, Entropy maximization and gravity models

References:

1.      Cascetta, E. Transportation Systems Analysis: Models and Application, Springer, 2009

2.      Sheffi, Y., Urban Transportation Networks: Equilibrium Analysis with Mathematical Programming Method. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1985

3.      Ran, B., and Boyce, D. E., Modeling Dynamic Transportation Network - An Intelligent Transportation System Oriented Approach, Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 1996.

4.      de Neufville, R. Applied Systems Analysis: Engineering Planning and Technology Management, McGraw Hill, 1990,

5.      Ortuzar J. Luis G. Willumsen, L. G. Modelling Transport, Willey, 2011

6.      Manheim, Analysis of Transportation Systems, MIT, USA, 1980.

7.      R.G. Weilson, Entropy in Urban and Regional Transportation, McGraw-Hill, 1980

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CE-780 Behavioral Travel Modelling

Survey design and analysis: travel surveys and their role in transport planning, survey methods, precision and accuracy in travel surveys, sample design, sampling procedures, survey format, pilot surveys, survey administration, collection of stated and revealed preference data, survey data processing. Individual choice theory: binary choice models, multinomial and multi-dimensional choice models, issues in model specification, methods and statistics of model estimation with emphasis on maximum-likelihood estimation, aggregation and forecasting with discrete choice models, validation and transferability aspects, ordered multinomial models, nested logit models, introduction to advanced concepts such as accommodating unobserved population heterogeneity in choice behavior, mixed logit models, joint stated preference and revealed preference modeling, and longitudinal choice analysis; discrete choice models for integrated land use and transport modelling, review of state-of-the-art and future directions

References:

1.      Ben-Akiva, M. and Lerman, S, Discrete Choice Analysis: Theory and Application to Travel Demand, MIT Press, 1985.

2.      Oppenheim, N., Urban Travel Demand Modeling: From Individual Choices to General Equilibrium, John Wiley, 1995.

3.      Borsch Supan Axel , Econometric analysis of discrete choice, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1987.

4.      Richardson, Ampt, and Meyburg, Survey Methods for Transport Planning, Eucalyptus Press, 1995.

5.      Domencich, T.A. and McFadden, D., Urban Travel Demand: A Behavioral Analysis, North-Holland, 1975.

6.      Selected papers from journals such as Transportation Research, Transportation Science, and Transportation Research Record.

 

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CE-6XX Optimization in Civil Engineering

Linear Programming: Formulating linear programs, Graphical solution of linear programs, Special cases of linear program, The Simplex Method: Converting a problem to standard form, The theory of the simplex method, The simplex algorithm, Special situations in the simplex algorithm, Obtaining initial feasible solution, Duality and sensitivity analysis: Sensitivity analysis, Shadow prices, Dual of a normal linear program, Duality theorems, Dual simplex method

Integer Programming: Formulating integer programming problems, The branch-and-bound algorithm for pure integer programs, The branch-and-bound algorithm for mixed integer programs,

Non-linear Programming: Introduction to non-linear programming (NLP), Convex and concave functions, NLP with one variable, Line search algorithms, Multivariable unconstrained problems, constrained problems, Lagrange Multiplier, The Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions, The method of steepest ascent, Convex combination method, penalty function methods, Quadratic programming, Dynamic programming, Evolutionary algorithms such Genetic Algorithm, concepts of multi-objective optimization, Markov Process, Queuing Models

References:

1.      S. S. Rao, Engineering Optimization: Theory and Practice, Wiley & Sons, New Jersey, 2009.

2.      F. H. Hillier and G. J. Liberman, Introduction to Operations Research, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2010.

3.      W. L. Winston, Operations Research: Applications and Algorithm, 4th Edition, Cengage Learning, 1994.

4.      A. Ravindran, D. T. Phillips, and J. J. Solberg, Operations Research: Principles and Practice, John Wiley and Sons, 1987.

5.      K. Deb, Optimization for Engineering Design, Prentice Hall, 2013.

6.      M. C. Joshi and K. M. Moudgalay, Optimization: Theory and Practice, Narosa, 2004.

7.      K. Deb, Multi-objective Optimization using evolutionary algorithms, John Wiley and Sons, 2009.

 

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CE-7XX Pavement Materials

Introduction materials used for construction of subgrade, aggregate base course, bituminous base and surface courses of pavements.  Understanding different tests: CBR, Durability, Freeze-Thaw, Resilient Modulus, soil-suction, relationship between DCP and CBR, CBR and Mr, and other parameters.

Characterization of aggregates for application in the pavements. Different types of rocks and aggregate production. Introduction to bitumen production and process, penetration and viscosity grading system for bitumen. Modification of bitumen using polymer and crumb rubber. Visco-elastic modeling (creep, mechanical models).

Introduction to Superpave grading system. Understanding mixing and compaction temperature of bitumen. Introduction to different types of mixes: Hot mix asphalt, cold mix asphalt. Understanding volumetric calculation. Marshall and Superpave mix designs of different types of mixes. Performance tests: fatigue and rutting tests, moisture induced damage and tests, resilient modulus, dynamic modulus/flow number/flow time. recycling, foam mix asphalt, recycle technologies, and warm mix asphalt, construction of perpetual pavements. Cement concrete mix design for pavements. Application of waste and locally materials for construction of pavements, quality control and assurance practices

References:

1.      F.L. Roberts, P.S. Kandhal, E.R. Brown, D.Y. Lee, and T.W. Kennedy “Hot Mix Asphalt Materials, Mixture Design and Construction,” National Asphalt Pavement Association Research and Education Foundation, Second Edition, 1996, USA.

2.      Y.H. Huang “Pavement Analysis and Design,” 2nd Edition, 2004, Pearson Prentice Hall, USA

3.      Asphalt Institute, SP-1: Performance Grading of Asphalt Binder – Specifications and Testing.

4.      MORT&H- Specifications for Roads and Bridges, 5th Revision, 2013.

 

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CEXXX –Advanced Highway Design and Analysis

Introduction to highway geometric design: Development IRC and AASHTO geometric design polices, Definition and scope of geometric design, Primary and dependent design controls. Human and vehicle factors: Concepts and application of human factors in design and typical vehicle factors used in geometric design. Sight distance: Overview of different type of sight distance, sight distance index, scaling and recording sight distance from plans, sight distance profile. Longitudinal Features of Horizontal and Vertical Profile: Factors influencing profile selection, horizontal curve, vertical curve, curves for special situation, characteristics of highway alignment, general principles of horizontal and vertical profile coordination and technique, elements of highway cross sections, developing cross sections, methods of attaining super elevation and graphical development of super elevation.

Highway location and alignment design: Location study, developing trial alignment, evaluating impacts, translating graphical alignment to mathematical component, single line sketching technique. Principles of intersection and interchange design: Design objectives, driver expectancy, geometric design controls, alignment and profile, lane width, design for turning movements, treatments for right turns, unconventional intersection and interchange design, channelization, intersection design templates, interchange design templates.Introduction to highway design software: Developing sight distance profile for highway alignment, Evaluating existing horizontal and vertical curves, Super elevation development, Intersection design, Interchange design

References:

1.      A policy on geometric design of highways and streets, American Association of State Highway Officials, 2011.

2.      Geometric design standards for urban roads in plains (IRC: 86-1983), The Indian Roads Congress, 1983.

3.      Geometric design standards for rural (non-urban) highways (IRC: 73-1980), The Indian Roads Congress, 1980.

4.      Guidelines for expressways – Part I, Ministry of Road Transport & Highways, 2010.

5.      Roadside design guide, American Association of State Highway Officials, 2002.

6.      Manual of geometric design standards for Canadian roads, Transportation Associations of Canada, 1986.

7.      Pline, J.L., Traffic Engineering Handbook, Institute of Transportation Engineers, 2009.

8.      Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, Federal Highway Administration, 2009.

9.      S.K. Khanna and C.E.G. Justo, Highway Engineering, Khanna Publishers, Roorkee, 2001

 

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CE-7XX Traffic Management and Design

Traffic Impact: Transportation noise: standards, measurements and mitigation strategies. Parking Studies: Statistics and analysis. Fuel Consumption and vehicle operating cost. Vehicular emission and Air quality modelling. Environmental impact assessment. Traffic safety: Accident studies, Accident data analysis, Statistical methods for data analysis, Road safety principles and practice, Identification of hazardous locations. Capacity and LOS analysis: Two Lane Highways, Urban Streets, Multilane Highways, Transit systems, Pedestrians and bicycles. Design of Traffic Facilities: Transit route selection and design, Pedestrians and bicycles facilities, Intersection, roundabout configuration and design, Interchange design, Freeway Operations and design. Traffic Management: Traffic Management Strategies, Traffic Management Techniques, Work zone traffic management, Traffic calming, Congestion studies and Road pricing. Automated Data Collection Systems: Intrusive systems such as loop detectors, pneumatic, etc., Non-Intrusive systems such as video, infra-red, In-vehicle systems: GPS, Mobiles, Tracking; Positioning systems for location services, Geographical information systems. Intelligent Transportation System: ITS: User services and architecture, ITS: Standards and evaluation, Public transport and bus priority, Travel time estimation methods, Artificial intelligence in advanced traffic and ITS

References:

1.      C. S. Papacostas and P. D. Prevedouros. Fundamentals of Transportation Engineering. Prentice-Hall, New Delhi, 2009.

2.      C. Jotin Khisty, B. Kent Lall, Transportation Engineering: An Introduction, Prentice Hall.

3.      N. J. Garber, L. A. Hoel, Traffic and Highway Engineering, Cengage Learning, 2008.

4.      L. R Kadiyali. Traffic Engineering and Transportation Planning. Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 2008.

5.      Highway Capacity Manual. Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C., 2010.

6.      F. L. Mannering, S. S. Washburn and W. P. Kilareski, Principles of Highway Engineering and Traffic Analysis, Wiley India, 2011.

7.      T. R. Currin, Introductions to Traffic Engineering: A Manual for Data Collection and Analysis. Brooks/Cole Thomason Learning, Canada, 2001.

8.      Hensher, D.A. and K.J. Button (eds) (2003) Handbook of Transport and the Environment, Handbooks in Transport #4, Amsterdam: Elsevier.

9.      M A Chowdhary and A Sadek. Fundamentals of Intelligent Transportation systems planning. Artech House Inc., US, 2003.

10.   Sussman, J. Perspectives on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). New York, NY: Springer, 2005.

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CE-7XX Transportation Project Evaluation and Decision Making

Introductory Concepts in Transportation Decision Making: Overall transportation project development, budgeting, financial planning, the process of transportation project development, models associated with transportation impact evaluation, procedural framework for transportation systems evaluation. Estimating Transportation Demand and Supply: Demand-supply equilibration, dynamics of transportation demand and supply, elasticity of travel demand and supply, classification of elasticity, consumer surplus and latent demand.

Transportation Costs: Classification of transportation costs, transportation agency costs, transportation user costs, general structure and behavior of cost functions and road pricing. Vehicle Operating Costs: Road user cost study in India, components of VOC, factors affecting VOC, fuel consumption relationships, procedural framework for assessing VOC impacts. Value of Travel Time Savings: Categorizations of travel time, framework for assessing travel time impacts, economic concept of evaluation of travel time savings, issues relating to travel time value estimation, methodology for monetary evaluation of passengers travel time, review of work in India on passengers’ travel time.

Accidents Costs: Relevance of accident costing for a developing country, procedural framework for safety impact evaluation, review of alternative methodologies for accident costing, certain issues connected with accident costing, methods for estimating crash reduction factors, before and after case studies.

Economic Evaluation of Transportation Projects: Economic significance of transport, performance measures in transportation evaluation, costs and benefits of transport projects, basic principles of economic evaluation, elements of engineering economics, methods of economic evaluation, benefit-cost ratio method, first year rate of return, net present value method, internal rate of return method, comparison of the various methods of economic evaluation, life cycle cost analysis, case studies, software packages for economic efficiency analysis.(HDM-4). Evaluation of Transportation Projects and Programs using Multiple Criteria: Basic concepts, Single vs. multiple criteria, Evaluation, decision-making, and optimization, Steps in multi-criteria decision-making, Case study: evaluation of metro rail projects using multi-criteria. Financial Analysis of Transportation Projects: Financial analysis of highway project case study, PPP based transport project case study

References:

1.      McCarthy, P. Transportation Economics, Blackwell, 2001

2.      Meyer John Robert Meyer, José A. Gómez-Ibáñez, William B.  Tye, Clifford Winston, Essays in Transportation Economics and Policy, Brookings Institution Press, 1999.

3.      Kenneth Duncan Boyer, Principles of transportation economics, Addison-Wesley, 1998

4.      Kumares C. Sinha, Samuel Labi, Transportation Decision Making: Principles of Project Evaluation and Programming, Wiley,2007

5.      C. Jotin Khisty, B. Kent Lall, Transportation Engineering: An Introduction, Prentice Hall, 2003.

6.      L. R Kadiyali. Traffic Engineering and Transportation Planning. Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 2008.

7.      Indian Roads Congress, (1992) “Manual for Road Investment Decision Model”, Special Publication 38, New Delhi.

8.      Indian Roads Congress, (2007) “Manual on Economic Analysis of Highway Projects”, Special Publication 30, New Delhi.

9.      Stuart Cole, Applied Transport Economics: Policy, Management & Decision Making, Kogan Page Publishers, 2005

10.   John Hibbs, Transport Economics & Policy: A Practical Analysis of Performance, Efficiency and Marketing Objectives, Kogan, 2003.

11.   Herbert Mohring, Transportation economics, Ballinger, 1976.

 

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CE-7XX Airport Planning and Design

History and organisation of air transport, Aircraft characteristics related to airport design, Airport configuration, Airport planning and air travel demand forecasting, Geometric design of the airside, Structural design of airfield pavements, airport drainage, Airport airside capacity and delay, Planning and design of the terminal area, Airport access, airport lighting and marking, Financial strategies for implementation, Environmental impacts of airports

References:

1.      R. Horonjeff and F. X. Mckelvey, Planning & Design of Airports, 5th Edition, Mc Graw Hill, New York, 2010.

2.      N. Ashford, S. Mumayiz and P. H. Wright, Airport Engineering, 4th Edition, John Wiley, New York, 2011.

3.      International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Design Manuals

4.      Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Advisory Circulars.

 

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CE-2: Geotechnical Engineering

Course Structure – Fourth Year

 

1st Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 401

Water Resources Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 463

Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 465

Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

2

1

0

6

Core Course

  CE 407

Foundation Engineering

 3

0

0

6

Core Course

  CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective I (PG Elective I)

6

Departmental UG Electives

  CE 6xx

PG Elective I

6

PG Core

CE 643

Experimental Geotechnics

4

PG Laboratory course

Total Credits

42

 

 

 

Fourth Year –2nd Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 6xx

PG Elective II

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

PG Elective III

6

         PG Elective

CE 694

Credit seminar

4

Seminar

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective II

6

 

Departmental UG Electives

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective III

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective IV

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective V

      6

Total Credits

42

 

 

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CE-643 Experimental Geotechnics

Processing of the soil, determination of hygroscopic moisture content, sieve analysis, hydrometer test, specific gravity test, liquid, plastic, and shrinkage limit tests, standard proctor compaction test, field density measurement tests (Sand replacement and core cutter), permeability test, oedometer test, direct shear test, consolidated undrained triaxial test, vane shear test, determination of free swell index for fine grained soils, evaluation of swelling pressure of soils, soil suction measurement, block vibration test, cyclic plate load test

References:

1.      Head, K.H. (2006). Manual of soil laboratory testing,  Volume I – Soil Classification and Compaction Tests, 3rd Edition, Whittles Publishing, Scotland, UK.

2.      Head, K.H. and Epps, R. J. (2011). Manual of soil laboratory testing,  Permeability, shear strength and compressibility tests, Volume II, 3rd Edition, Whittles Publishing, Scotland, UK.

3.      Head, K.H. and Epps, R. J. (2014). Manual of soil laboratory testing, Vol.III – Effective stress tests, Whittles Publishing, Whittles Publishing, Scotland, UK.

4.      Das, B.M. (2009). Soil Mechanics Laboratory Manual, 7th Edition, Oxford University Press, New York.

5.      Relevant Indian and ASTM standards.

 

 

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Course Structure – Fifth Year

 

Fifth Year –1st Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE xxx

PG Elective IV

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

PG Elective V

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

PG Elective VI

6

PG Eelective

CE xxx

DDP-I

36

 

Total Credits

54

 

 

 

 

Fifth Year –2nd Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE xxx

PG Elective VII

6

PG  Elective

CE xxx

PG Elective VIII

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

DDP-II

36

 

Total Credits

48

 

 


 

List of CE-2 PG Electives

 

Course Code

Course Title

CE 632

Ground Improvement

CE 633

Soil Structure Interaction

CE 637

Rock Mechanics

CE 640

Foundation Engineering

CE 641

Environmental Geomechanics

CE 645

Geotechnical Centrifuge Modelling

CE 647

Soil Dynamics and Machine Foundations

CE 648

Finite Element Methods in Geotechnical Engineering

CE 652

Foundations of Offshore Structures

CE 683

Marine Geotechnical Engg

CE 684

Advanced Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering

CE 688

Risk Assessment & Management in Geotechnical Engineering

CE 702

Geotechnical Constitutive Models

CE 746

Reinforced Earth and Geotextiles

 


 

CE-632 Ground Improvement

Problematic soils; Need for ground improvement; Various ground improvement techniques; Embankment construction on soft soils; Preloading with and without vertical drains; Prefabricated Vertical (PV) Drains; Design of ground improvement scheme with PV drains and preloading; Vacuum consolidation; Vacuum consolidation along with PV drains; Theory of electro-kinetic dewatering of soils and its applications; Grouting; Grouting methods; Permeating grouting; Displacement grouting; Jet grouting; Grout mixes and their selection criteria; Deep mixing methods; Densification techniques for cohesion-less soils – Vibro floatation; Vibro-replacement technique; Blasting; Design of blasting scheme; Dynamic compaction and application; Design of dynamic compaction scheme; Stone columns and their design; Test methods for verification of ground improvement techniques – Standard Penetration Test; Cone Penetrometer Test; Vane shear strength test; Pressuremeter test, Packer test, Load tests, etc. Theory and applications of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technique

References:

1.      Bowles, J.E. (1996). Foundation Analysis and Design, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill International Editions, publishers, New York.

2.      Hausmann, M.R. (1990).  Engineering Principles of Ground modification. McGraw-Hill Inc.,USA

3.      Mooseley, M.P. and Kirsch, K. (2004). Ground Improvement. 2nd Edition, Spon Press, Taylor and Francis Group, London, United Kingdom.

4.      Xanthakos, P.P., Abramson, L.W., and Bruce, D.A. (1994). Ground control and Improvement. Wiley Interscience Edition, John-Wiley & Sons, Inc, Newyork, USA.

 

 

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CE-633 Soil Structure Interaction

Critical study of conventional methods of foundation design; Nature and complexities of soil structure interaction; Application of advanced techniques of analysis such as the finite element method, finite differences, relaxation and interaction for the evaluation of soil-structure interaction for different types of structures under various conditions of loading and subsoil characteristics; Preparation of comprehensive design oriented computer programmes for specific problems. Interaction problems based on the theory of sub-grade reaction such as beams, footings, rafts, bulkheads etc. Analysis of different types of frame structures founded on stratified natural deposits with linear and nonlinear stress-strain characteristics. Determination of pile capacities, negative skin friction and group action of piles considering stress-strain characteristics of real soils; Anchor piles and determination of pull out resistance; Well foundations

References:

1.      J.E., Bowles, Analytical and Computer Methods in Foundation Engineering, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1974.

2.      C.S. Desai and J.T. Christian (Eds.), Numerical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Yew York.

3.      Elastic Analysis of Soil-coundation Interaction, Developments in Geotechnical Engineering, Vol.17, Elservier Scientific Publishing Co.

 

 

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CE-637 Rock Mechanics

Engineering properties of rock masses, subsurface investigations in rock deposits, field and laboratory testing of rocks, stress-deformation characteristics of rock masses under heavy loads, flow of water through rock masses, failure theories, shear strength of rock under high pressure, friction in rocks, time dependent properties of rock masses, stability of rock slopes, idealised rock system, anisotropic rock system, deep cuts, deep bore-holes, stability of bounder fills and embankment, lateral pressure on retaining structures for high hill slopes, bearing capacity of rock masses, opening in rocks, lines and unlined tunnels, pressure tunnels and tunnels for other purposes

References:

1.      J.C. Jaeger and N.G.W. Cook, Fundamentals of Rock Mechanics, Methuen and Co., London, 1971.

2.      Obert, Leonard and W.I. Duvall, Rock Mechanics and Design Structures of Rock, 1967.

3.      J.A. Hudson et al. (Ed.), Comprehensive Rock Mechanics, in 5 volumes, Pergamon Press, 1993.

 

 

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CE-640 Foundation Engineering

Planning of subsoil exploration of major civil engineering projects, sampling methods, interpretation of field and laboratory data, plate load and pile load tests, extrapolation of test data for actual foundations, shallow and deep footings, design of isolated and combined footings, proportioning of footings for equal settlement, various methods of raft design, floating foundations, analysis and design of pile foundations, rake piles, board piles. Negative skin friction in piles, group action in piles, design of pile cap, foundations subjected to economic loads, pull-out resistance of foundation structures, theory of sub-grade reaction, anchored bulkheads, caissons and cofferdams, well foundations

References:

1.      J.E. Bowles, Foundations Analysis and Design, 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1968.

2.      R.B. Peck, W.E. Hanson and T.H. Thornburn, Foundation Engineering, 2nd Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New Jersey, 1974.

3.      D. Choudhury, Foundation Engineering, NPTEL Web course, 2010. http://nptel.ac.in/courses/105107120/

 

 

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CE-641 Environmental Geomechanics

General Principles: Introduction, Nature of soil and environment, Soil technology, Soil-water-air interaction, Shrinkage, Swelling, and Cracking characteristics of soil, Hydraulic conductivity and mass transport phenomena, Thermal and electrical properties of soils, Radiation effects on soil. Environmental geotechnical applications

References:

1.      Dixon, J.B. and Weed, S.B., Minerals in Soil Environments, SSSA, 1989.

2.      Rees, J.F., Contaminated Land Treatment Technologies, SCI, Elsevier Applied Science, London, 1992.

3.      Acar, Y.B. and Daniel, D.E., Geoenvironmental 2000: Characterisation, Containment, Remediation & Performance in Environmental Geotechnics, ASCE, New York, 2000.

4.      Methods of Soil Analysis, SSSA, 2nd Edition, Physical and Chemical Processes of Water and Solute Transport/Retention in Soils, SSSA.

 

 

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CE-645 Geotechnical Centrifuge Modelling

Modelling and simulation - Dimensional analysis; Physical modelling using Centrifuge, historical perspectives, developments in hardware; Equipment - type of centrifuges; Principles of centrifuge modelling: scaling laws for static, dynamic loading and scaling laws for diffusion phenomena, Scale effects: Dependency of soil behaviour on stress level and stress history; Rotational acceleration and stress field, Modelling of models, Coriolis effect in Centrifuge, Grain size effects; Instrumentation in centrifuge modelling; Data acquisition systems; Applications of centrifuge modelling -Embankments and Dams, Shallow foundations, Deep foundations, Retaining structures, Anchorages, Ground improvement, Environmental geotechnics, Earthquake effects

References:

1.      Craig, W.H., The application of centrifuges modelling to Geotechncial Design, Proceedings of a Symposium, Manchester, Balkema, April, 1984,

2.      Proceedings of the International Conferences- Centrifuge `88, Centrifuge `91, Centrifuge `94, Centrifuge `98, Centrifuge 2002, Balkema.

3.      Taylor, R.N., (ed.), Geotechnical Centrifuge Technology, Blackie Academic & Professional, 1995.

 

 

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CE-647 Soil Dynamics and Machine Foundations

Vibration of elementary systems, degrees of freedom, analysis of systems with several degrees of freedom, natural frequencies of continuous systems, elastic constants of soil and their experimental determination, damping of soil, effect of vibration on residual soil settlements, effect on porosity and hydraulic methods to reduce residual dynamic settlement of foundations, stress distribution in soil under dynamic loading. Influence on shearing strength, vibro-viscous soil resistance, liquefaction, bearing capacity of dynamically loaded foundations, such as those of water towers, chimneys and high rise buildings, response of pile foundations, wave propagation in elastic half space, waves in layered systems and in saturated media, vibration isolation methods

References:

1.      D.D. Barkan, dynamics of Bases and Foundations, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1952.

2.      E.E. Rihcart et al., Vibrations of Soils and Foundations, Prentice Hall Inc., 1970.

3.      S.P. Timoshenko, D.H. Young and William Weaver, Jr., Vibration Problems in Engineering, John Wiley and Sons, 1974.

4.      Braja M. Das and G. V. Ramana, Principles of Soil Dynamics, 2nd Edition, Cengage Learning, 2010.

5.      Shamsher Prakash, Soil Dynamics, 3rd Edition, John Wiley, 2000.

6.      D. Choudhury, Soil Dynamics, NPTEL Video course, 2014. http://nptel.ac.in/courses/105101005/.

 

 

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CE-648 Finite Element Methods in Geotechnical Engineering

Theory: energy concepts and variational principles, discretization of continuous media, two and three dimensional analysis, stiffness of simple elements, Isoparametric elements and interface elements, assembly and solution techniques, computerisation, introduction to nonlinear problems, plasticity problems and no tension analysis, applications to problems such as stress distribution and deformations in isotropic and anisotripic soil and rock media, stress and deformations around excavations and built-up embankments, seepage through porous media, one dimensional consolidation, stress distribution around openings in intact and fisssured rock

References:

1.      Robert D. Cook, Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis, Third Edition, John Wiley and Sons.

2.      C.S. Desai, J.F. Abel, Introduction to the Finite Element Method, A numerical Method for Engineering Analysis, East-West Edition, 1972.

3.      O.C. Zienkiewicz and R.L. Taylor, Finite Element Method, McGraw-Hill, 1991.

 

 

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CE-652 Foundations of Offshore Structures

Nature and magnitude of loads on foundations of offshore structures, criteria of foundation design in offshore environment, features of foundations of gravity structures, bearing capacity and settlement under dynamic loads, immediate and long term behaviour, liquefaction under cyclic loads, problems relating to jack-up platforms, dynamic stress in pile driving, pile behaviour under cyclic lateral loads, development of p-y curves, analysis of single piles and pile groups, finite element and other numerical methods of interactive analysis using linear and nonlinear foundation response, geotechnical aspects of anchors and submarine pipelines.

References:

1.      Proceedings of the Conference on Behaviour of Offshore Structure, 1976.

2.      Proceedings of the Conference on Finite Element Methods in Geotechnical Engineering (Ed.),

3.      C.S. Desai. Proceedings of Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas.

 

 

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CE-683 Marine Geotechnical Engineering

Origin and formation of submarine deposits, characteristics of continental shielding various parts of the world and around Indian coast, methods of exploration of submarine deposits, obtaining undistributed samples and determination of insitu strength, evaluation of physical and chemical properties of submarine soils, consolidation, settlement characteristics and shear strength characteristics under static and wave loading, pore pressure and liquefaction under dynamic and earthquake stresses, bearing capacity of large bases and tips, development of design parameters for use in pile soil and gravity platform soil, analysis both under static and dynamic conditions

References:

1.      Proceedings of the Conferences on Behaviour of Offshore Structures.

2.      Proceedings of Offshore Technology Conferences.

3.      Proceedings of Annual Offshore Technology Conferences, Houston, Texas, 1969-1979.

4.      Proceedings of First International Conference on Behaviour of Offshore Structures, Oslo, Published by the Institute of Technology, Norway, 1976.

5.      Proceedings of Second International Conference on Behaviour of Offshore Structures, London, Published by BHRA Fluid Engineering, 1979.

 

 

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CE-684 Advanced Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering

Introduction to Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, Seismology and Earthquakes, Strong Ground Motion, Earthquake Hazards Related to Geotechnical Engineering, Wave Propagation, Liquefaction, Liquefaction computation from laboratory and field tests, Seismic Slope Stability, Behaviour of reinforced slope under seismic condition, Seismic Design of Retaining Walls, Force based Pseudo-Static Pseudo-Dynamic Analysis, bearing capacity and settlement, Seismic Design of Pile Foundations, Seismic Uplift Capacity of Anchors, Soil Improvement for Remediation of Seismic Hazards, Recommendations of Seismic Design Codes related to Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering

References:

1.      Steven L. Kramer (2003). Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, Prentice Hall International Series, Pearson Education, New Delhi.

2.      R. W. Day (2002). Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering Handbook, McGraw Hill, New York.

3.      IS 1893-1984 Indian Standard Criteria for Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures, Part 5 (fourth revision), 1984.

4.      D. Choudhury, Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, NPTEL Video course, 2014. http://nptel.ac.in/courses/105101134/

 

 

 

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CE-688 Risk Assessment and Management in Geotechnical Engineering

Working stress and limit state design approaches, Ultimate and Service limit states, Basics of probability and statistics, Sources of uncertainty in Geotechnical design parameters, In-situ soil characterization, Sensitivity analysis, Modelling of uncertainty, Fragility curves, Probability of failure, FORM, Monte Carlo Simulation Techniques, Response Surface Method, Parallel and series systems, Explicit and implicit functions, Target reliability index, LRFD approach, Code calibration, Applications to shallow and deep foundations, landslides and embankments, liquefaction behaviour of soils

References:

1.      Ang, A.H-S. And Tang, W.H. (2006). Praobability Concepts in Engineering: Emphasis on Applications to Civil and Environmental Engineering, John Wiley & Sons.

2.      Baecher, G. and Christian, J. (2005). Reliability and Statiestics in Geotechnical Engineering, Wiley Publications, 618 p.

3.      Haldar, A. and Mahadevan, S. (2000): Probability, Reliability and Statistical Methods in Engineering Design, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 304 p

4.      Nowak, A.S. And Collins, D. R. (2000). Reliability of Structures, McGraw-Hill International Editions, Civil Engineering Series, Singapore, 338 p.

5.      Ranganathan, R. (1990). Reliability Analysis and Design of Structures, Tata McGraaw Hill, New Delhi.

6.      Fenton, G.A. (1997). Probabilistic Methods in Geotechnical Engineering, ASCE Geotechnical Safety and Reliability Committee, 95 p.

 

 

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CE-702 Geotechnical Constitutive Models

Introduction to shear strength of soils, Critical state line, Taylor302222s stress-dilatancy equation, Generalised Hooke302222s Law, isotropy and anisotropy, elastic and plastic deformation, ingredients of a plastic soil model, normality assumption and associated flow rule, compression behaviour and plasticity, behaviour of Cam Clay under drained and undrained loading, relationship between undrained shear strength, effective stress and over-consolidation ratio, generalised equations of state boundary surface

References:

1.      A.N. Schofield, Disturbed soil properties and geotechnical design, Thomas Telford, 2006

2.      A.M. Britto and M.J. Gunn, Critical State Soil Mechanics via Finite Elements, Ellis Horwood, Chichester, 1987

3.      D.M. Wood, Soil Behaviour and Critical State Soil Mechanics, Cambridge University Press, New York, 1990

4.      M.D. Bolton, A Guide to Soil Mechanics, McMillan, London, 1984

5.      P.K. Banerjee and R. Butterfield, Advanced geotechnical analyses, Elsevier Science Publishers, Cambridge University Press, 1991

 

 

 

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CE-746 Reinforced Earth and Geotextiles

Basic introduction to the elements of Ground Engineering characteristics of reinforcing materials, definition of reinforced and advantage of RE, soil reinforcement interaction, behaviour of Reinforced earth walls, basis of wall design, the Coulomb force method, the Rankine force methods, internal and external stability condition, field application of RE, randomly reinforced earth and analysis of reinforced soils, testing of soil reinforcements. Definitions, functions, properties, and application of Geotextiles, design of Geotextile applications, definitions, functions, properties and applications of geo-membranes, design of geo-membranes applications, Geotextiles associated with geo-membranes, testing on geotextiles, environmental efforts, ageing and weathering.

References:

1.      International Conference on Soil Reinforcement, RE and other techniques, Paris, March, 1979.

2.      Second International Conference on Geotextiles, Las Vegas, August, 1982.

3.      International Conferences in-situ soil and rock reinforcement, Paris, October, 1984.

 

 

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CE-3: Water Resources Engineering

Course Structure – Fourth Year

 

1st Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 401

Water Resources Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 463

Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 465

Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

2

1

0

6

Core Course

  CE 407

Foundation Engineering

 3

0

0

6

Core Course

  CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective I (PG Elective I)

6

Departmental UG Electives

  CE 731

Mechanics of Fluid Flow

6

PG Core

CE 676 or        CE 768 or         CE 608

Water Resources System

or

Urban Water and Environmental Management

or

Eco-hydro-climatology

6

PG Elective I

Total Credits

42

 

 

 

Fourth Year –2nd Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 607

Numerical Techniques in Hydraulic Engineering

6

PG Core

CE 604

Applied Statistics

6

             PG Core

CE 694

Credit seminar

4

Seminar

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective II

6

 

Departmental UG Electives

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective III

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective IV

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective V

      6

Total Credits

40

 

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CE-731 Mechanics of Fluid Flow

Equations of motion and continuity, integral equations of momentum and energy and control volume approach, laminar flow in pipes and channel, elements of boundary layer concepts, boundary shear stress-skin drag, turbulent flow in pipes and channels, velocity distribution, (manifolds, diffusion of jets, out-falls and dispersion in open channels), steady but nonuniform flow profiles in channels, channel design, form drag losses in pipe and channel transitions-design of siphon and channel transitions, unsteady flow in open channels, surges in channels linked with hydraulics of gates and their operation.

References:

1.      R. H. French, Open Channel Hydraulics, McGraw Hill, New York, 1986.

2.      J.W. Daily and Harleman D.R.F., Fluid Dynamics, Addition Wesley, New York, 1973.

3.      R. A. Granger, Fluid Mechanics, Dover Publications. New York, 1995.

 

 

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CE-607 Numerical Techniques in Hydraulic Engineering

Polynomial Solutions by root squaring method, bisections, regula falsi, Bairstows and Newton-Raphson methods; System of Linear Equations, Iterative methods, direct methods, conjugate gradient method; sparse matrices and compact storage schemes; Inversion of complex matrices; Partial differential equations, Finite difference schemes, ADI method; Eigenvalues and system of linear differential equations, eigen vectors; Runge-Kutta methods; Gradually varied unsteady flow equations, Finite difference schemes, implicit and explicit methods, method of characteristics; Finite element method and applications in fluid mechanics, water resources and environmental engineering.

References:

1.      K. A. Hoffmann and S. T. Chiange, Computational Fluid Dynamics for Engineers, Vol. I, Engineering Education System, Wichita, Kanasas, 1993.

2.      S. C. Chapra and R. P. Canale, Numerical Methods for Engineers, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1990.

 

 

 

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Course Structure – Fifth Year

 

Fifth Year –1st Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 675

Advanced Experimental Fluid Mechanics

4

PG Laboratory course

CE 673

Groundwater Systems and Management

6

PG Core

CE 676

or

CE 768

or

CE 608

Water Resources System 

OR

Urban Water and Environmental Management OR

Eco-hydro- climatology

6

PG Elective II

CE xxx

DDP-I

36

 

Total Credits

52

 

 

 

 

Fifth Year –2nd Semester

 

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 669

Physical and Stochastic Hydrology

6

PG Core

CE 766

or

CE 667

Watershed Management  

OR

Hydraulic Structures

6

PG Elective III

CE xxx

DDP-II

36

 

Total Credits

48

 

 


 

CE 675 - Advanced Experimental Fluid Mechanics

 

Experiments in open channel hydraulics – Flow measurements in channels; Hydraulic jump; surges and waves in channels; weirs and spillways; sedimentation and scouring.

Experiments in Fluid Mechanics: Basic fluid mechanics experiments; Drag and lift experiments; experiments in wind tunnel; pipe network experiments; water hammer experiments; potential flow experiments; vortex flows.

Hydraulic machinery experiments: Experiments on turbines (Francis, Pelton, Kaplan); centrifugal pump.

Hydrologic experiments: Rainfall intensity measuremnets; hydrology bench and watershed based experiments.

Errors in Experimentation, Uncertainty in experiments, law of propagation of errors, instruments for measurements of Stage, discharge and velocity, current meters, , data reduction and report preparation.

Reference:

1.      A.T. Troskolansky, Hydrometry-Theory and Practice of Hydraulic Measurements, Pergamon Press, New York, 1970.P.R.

2.      Bevington, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for Physical Sciences, McGraw Hill Book Co., New York, 1970.

E.O. Doebelin, Measurement Systems-Application and Design, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1980.

 

 

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CE 673 - Ground Water Systems and Management

Concept of Groundwater System, Definition of input and output to the system and systems parameters. Generalised governing equations for groundwater flow in confined, phreatic and sloping base aquifers involving heterogeneous flow domains. Steady state and time variant problems in groundwater flow. Applicable boundary conditions to the flow regions and derivation of free surface boundary conditions. Exploration of aquifers by seismic refraction methods. Analytical solutions to flow equations. Electrical modeling of aquifers and simulation of source, sink and various recharge terms in the aquifers. Importance of numerical modeling. Field applicable approaches to model the regional aquifers. Well hydraulics. Inverse modeling of aquifer systems incorporating the recent trends in auto calibration of aquifer models. Groundwater development and management.

References:

1.      Batu V, Aquifer Hydraulics, John Wiley, New York, 1998.

2.      Bruggman G, An Analytical solutions to geo hydrological problems, Elsevier, Amsterdam 1999

3.      Bjerg P L et al (Eds)   Groundwater 2000.

4.      Sato K and Iwasa Y (Eds)  Groundwater Updates, Springer, Verlag, 2000

5.      Elango L and Jayakumar R (Eds) Modeling in Hydrogeology, Allied Pub., New Delhi, 2001

6.      Weight W D and J L Sonderegger, Manual of applied field hydrogeology, McGraw Hill, 2001

 

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CE 676 - Water Resources Systems

Objective of water resources development, Economic analysis and discounting techniques, Conditions of project optimality, Graphic optimization techniques for multipurpose projects, Analytical optimization techniques for water resources projects by linear programming, Nonlinear programming and Dynamic programming. Optimization by simulation, Mathematical models for large-scale multipurpose projects, Different case studies. Stochastic optimization techniques, Water quality subsystems, Optimum operation models for reservoir systems by incremental dynamic programming, Sequencing of multipurpose project. Economics of planning and decision making of water resources projects? Flood, Waterpower, Irrigation and Drainage. Introduction to artificial neural network and genetic algorithm; Applications in water resources.

References:

1.      W.A. Hall, and J.A. Dracup, Water Resources Systems Engineering, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1970.

2.      L.D. James, and R.R. Lee, Economics of Water Resources Planning, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1971.

3.      D.P. Louck, J.R. Stedinger, and D.A. Haith, Water Resources Systems, Planning and Analysis, Prentice Hall, London, 1981.

4.      A.K. Biswas, System Approach to Water Management, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1976.

5.      L. Votruba, Analysis of Water Resources Systems, Elsevier, London, 1988.

6.      J.E. Dayoff, Neural Networks Architecture: An Introduction, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1990.

7.      D.E. Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization and Machine Learning, Addison Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, 1989.

 

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CE 608 - Eco-hydro-climatology

Introduction to Eco-hydro-climatology: an interdisciplinary framework; Climate System; Climate, weather and Climate Change; Overview of Earth??s Atmosphere; Vertical Structure of Atmosphere; Radiation and Temperature; Laws of Radiation; Heat-Balance of Earth Atmosphere System; Random Temperature Variation; Modeling Vertical Variation in Air Temperature; Temporal Variation of Air temperature; Temperature Change in Soil; Thermal Time and Temperature Extremes. Hydrologic Cycle: Introduction; Global water balance; Cycling of water on land, a simple water balance model; Climate Variables affecting Precipitation, Precipitation and Weather, Humidity, Vapor Pressure, Forms of Precipitation, Types of Precipitation; Cloud; Atmospheric Stability; Monsoon; Wind Pattern in India; Global Wind Circulation; Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall. Climate Variability: Floods, Droughts, Drought Indicators, Heat waves, Climate Extremes. Climate Change: Introduction; Causes of Climate Change; Modeling of Climate Change, Global Climate Models, General Circulation Models, Downscaling; IPCC Scenarios; Commonly used Statistical Methods in Hydro-climatology: Trend Analysis; Empirical Orthogonal Functions, Principal Component Analysis; Canonical Correlation; Statistical Downscaling with Regression Ecological Climatology: Leaf energy fluxes and leaf photosynthesis; Plant canopies, ecosystem and vegetation dynamics; Coupled climate vegetation dynamics, Carbon cycle climate feedbacks, Introduction to Precipitation Recycling

References:

1.      Bonan G. B. ,Ecological Climatology, Cambridge University Press, 2002

2.      Burde, G. I., A. Zangvil, 2001: The Estimation of Regional Precipitation Recycling. Part I: Review of Recycling Models. J. Climate, 14,

3.      Campbell, G. G. and Norman J. M., An Introduction to Environmental Biophysics, Springer, 1998

4.      Von Stoech and Zwiers F W, Statistical Analysis in Climatic Research, Cambridge, 1999

5.      McGuffie, K. and Henderson-Sellers, A Climate Modelling Primer, Wilby, 2005

6.      IPCC Assessment Report 4

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CE 768 - Urban Water and Environmental Management

Review of Urban Hydrologic and Hydraulic Principles: Urban hydrologic cycle, rainfall analysis and design storm, hydraulic and hydrodynamic principles Introduction to Drainage Problems in Different Climate: Urbanisation - its effects and consequences for drainage, Interaction between urban and peri-urban areas. Planning concepts and System Planning: Objectives of urban drainage and planning criteria, drainage option and system layout, Planning tools and data requirement, Drainage master plan, Drainage structures Calculation Methods and Mathematical Tools: Modeling formulas, Hydrologic models, Hydrodynamic models, Regression analysis, Urban runoff and water quality models Design of Drainage System Elements: Hydraulic fundamentals, Infiltration and on-site detention of storm water, design of sewerage and drainage channels, design of appurtenances and pumping stations Control of Stormwater Pollution: Pollution bid-up and washoff process with reference to urban drainage systems, Source control in commercial and industrial complexes, Biological and chemical treatment of waste water, Best management practices Operation and Maintenance of Urban Drainage Systems: Maintenance requirements and planning, Cleansing of sewers and drains, repair options Administrative and Legal Aspects and Financing: Administrative, legal and financing aspects, International, national and municipal legal aspects, Administrative structure for drainage planning, Financing for drainage projects.

References:

1.      Akan, A.O., Urban Stormwater Hydrology: A Guide to Engineering Calculations, Lancaster Technomic, 1993.

2.      Hall M.J., Urban Hydrology, Elsevier Applied Sc., London, 1984.

3.      Strickland, G., Urban hydrology for small watersheds, NTIS, Springfield, 1975.

4.      Stormwater collection systems design handbook, Larry, W.M., (ed), McGraw-Hill, New York, 2001.

5.      Deb, R., Municipal Stormwater Management, Lewis, 1995.

6.      Hittman Associates, Approaches to Stormwater Management, NTIS, Springer, 1973.

 

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CE 669 - Physical and Stochastic Hydrology

Review of physical hydrologic principles, collection and interpretation of hydrologic data, hydrograph analysis, characteristics of hydrologic phenomena, random phenomena and their distributions. Combinational analysis, geometric probability, Markov chains, mathematics expectation and variance of random variables, concepts of risk and uncertainty in hydrology, empirical distributions of hydrologic variables, probability distributions function in hydrology, sampling theory, testing of hypotheses, correlation and regression, multivariable analysis, auto-correlation and cross correlation, special components in hydrologic series intermittent hydrologic process.

References:

1.      Ven Te Chow, Editor, Handbook of Applied Hydrology, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1964.

2.      V. Yevjevich, Probability and Statistics in Hydrology, Water Resources Publications, Fort Collins, Colorado, 1972.

 

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CE 766 - Watershed Management

Principles of Watershed Management: Basics concepts, Hydrology and water availability, Surface water, Groundwater, Conjunctive use, Human influences in the water resources system, Water demand, Integrated water resources system - River basins Watershed Management Practices in Arid and Semi-arid Regions, Watershed management through wells, Management of water supply - Case studies, short term and long term strategic planning Conservation of Water: Perspective on recycle and reuse, Waste water reclamation Social Aspects of Watershed Management: Community participation, Private sector participation, Institutional issues, Socio-economy, Integrated development, Water legislation and implementations, Case studies Sustainable Watershed Approach: Sustainable integrated watershed management, natural resources management, agricultural practices, integrated farming, Soil erosion and conservation Water Harvesting: Rainwater management - conservation, storage and effective utilisation of rainwater, Structures for rainwater harvesting, roof catchment system, check dams, aquifer storage Applications of Geographical Information System and Remote Sensing in Watershed Management, Role of Decision Support System in Watershed Management

References:

1.      Murty, J.V.S., Watershed Management, New Age Intl., New Delhi 1998.

2.      Allam, G.I.Y., Decision Support System for Integrated Watershed Management, Colorado State University, 1994.

3.      Vir Singh, R., Watershed Planning and Management, Yash Publishing House, Bikaner, 2000.

4.      Murthy, J.V.S., Watershed Management in India, Wiley Eastern, New Delhi, 1994.

American Society of Civil Engineers, Watershed Management, American Soc. of Civil Engineers, New York, 1975.

 

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CE 667 - Hydraulic Structures

Hydraulic and structural design of storage reservoirs, spillways, outlet works, river training and regulations, conduit systems, transition structures, fluid elasticity, fundamental and engineering aspects of fluid structure iteration, static and dynamic response of elastic structures.

References:

1.      Bourgin, Design of Dams and Sons, Ltd., 1953,

2.      Sir Issac Pitman. S. Leliavsky, Irrigation and Hydraulic Design, Vols.I, II, and III, Chapman and Hall, Ltd., London, 1957.

3.      M.M. Grishin (Ed.), Hydraulic Structures, Vol.II, Mir Publishers, Moscow, 1982.

 

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CE-4: Dual Degree in Structural Engineering

Course structure – Fourth Year

 

Fourth year – 1st semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

 

L

T

P

CE 401

Water Resources Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 463

Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 465

Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering**

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 407

Foundation Engineering

 3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective I***

6

Departmental UG Elective

CE 623

Advanced Solid Mechanics

6

PG Core

CE 616

Structural Dynamics

6

PG Core

Total Credits

42

 

** Students applying for DD Structures program must take this course in their Vth semester itself.

*** CE 403 Advanced Design of Structures or Equivalent

Fourth year – 2nd semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

L

T

P

CE 610

Introduction to Earthquake Engineering

6

PG Core

CE 620

Finite Element Methods

6

PG Core

CE 694

Credit Seminar

4

Seminar

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective II**

6

 

Departmental UG Electives

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective III

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective IV

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective V

      6

Total Credits

40

 

** One of the Electives should be CE 448 Pre-stressed Concrete Design


 

CE 623 - Advanced Solids Mechanics

Linear elasticity, Stress, strain, constitutive relations; Boundary conditions, Description of an Elasticity problem as a boundary value problem, Plane stress, strain, axi-symmetric problems, Large displacements and large strains; Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; Introduction to curvilinear coordinates; Thermal strains. Introduction to plasticity; Yield condition; Ideal elasto-plastic material; complete formulation for an elasto-plastic problem.

References:

1.      N. Filonenko-Borodich, Theory of Elasticity, Mir Publishers, Moscow, 1965.

2.      S.P. Timoshenko and J.N. Goodier, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd edition, McGraw Hill, Singapore, 1970.

3.      C.R. Calladine, Plasticity for Engineers, Ellis Herwood, Chichester, U.K., 1985.

 

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CE 616 - Structural Dynamics

SDOF System : Equation of motion; Free vibration; Harmonic load; Evaluation of damping,; Periodic load; General load (time domain, frequency domain); Response spectrum load. MDOF Systems : Structural matrices; Un-damped free vibration; Generation of damping matrix, Mode superposition analysis; Practical considerations. Continuous Systems : Equation of motion; Un-damped free vibration; Forced response. Random Vibrations : Random variables and random recesses; Models of random dynamic loads; Stochastic response of SDOF and MDOF systems.

References:

1.      A. K. Chopra, Dynamics of Structures Applications to Earthquake Engineering, Prentice Hall, 1994.

2.      R. W. Clough and J. Penzien, Dynamics of Structures, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, Singapore, 1993.

3.      L. Meirovitch, Elements of Vibration Analysis, 2nd edition, McGraw-Hill, Singapore, 1986

 

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CE 610 - Introduction to Earthquake Engineering

Characterisation of ground motion, Earthquake intensity and magnitude; Recording instruments and base line correction; Predominant period and amplification through soil; Earthquake spectra for elastic and inelastic systems; Idealisation of structural systems for low, medium and high rise buildings; Lateral force evaluation by mode superposition and direct integration; Reserve energy technique; Effect of foundation/soil on earthquake response; Analysis for torsion; Review of damages during past earthquakes and remedial measures; Reinforcement detailing for members and joints coupling; Codal provisions.

References:

1.      A. K. Chopra, Dynamics of Structures: Applications to Earthquake Engineering, Prentice-Hall, New York, 1995.

2.      R.W. Clough and J. Penzien, Dynamics of Structures, 2nd edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1992.

3.      N.M. Newmark and E. Rosenblueth, Fundamentals of Earthquake Engineering, Prentice Hall, New York, 1971.

4.      D. Key, Earthquake Design Practice for Building, Thomas Telford, London, 1988.

5.      R.L. Wiegel, Earthquake Engineering, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, London, 1989.

6.      J.A. Blume, N.M. Newmark, and L.H. Corning, Design of Multi-storied Buildings for Earthquake Ground Motions, Portland Cement Association, Chicago, 1961.

7.      Proceedings of World Conferences on Earthquake Engineering, 1956-2000.

8.      I.S. Codes No.1893, 4326,13920.

 

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Course structure – Fifth year

Fifth Year – 1st Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE xxx

PG Elective III

6

PG Elective

CE 6xx

Structural Stability and Plastic Analysis

8

PG Core

CE xxx

DDP-I

36

 

Total Credits

50

 

** Relevant parts of approved courses CE 619 Structural Stability and CE 621 Plastic Analysis

 

Fifth Year – 2nd Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE xxx

PG Elective V

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

PG Elective VI

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

DDP-II

36

 

Total Credits

48

 

 

List of CE-4: PG Electives

·        CE 615 Structural Optimization

·        CE 617 Plate and Shells

·        CE 639 Green Building Design

Other Approved PG Courses in Structures, Other Groups, and Other Departments as recommended by Faculty Advisor/Thesis Supervisor

 


 

CE 619 - Structural Stability

Concepts of stability, static, dynamic and energy criteria; Buckling Snap through and post-buckling; stability of columns and beams; Inelastic buckling; Beam-columns; stability of frames; Matrix stiffness and finite element methods applied to stability problems; introduction to stability of plates, shells and stiffened plates.

References:

1.      Don O. Brush and B.O.Almorth, Buckling of Bare, Plates and Shells, McGraw-Hill, New York 1975.

2.      S.P.Timoshenko and J.M.Gere, Theory of Elastic Stability, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill New York, 1961.

3.      A.Chajes, Principles of Structural Stability Theory, Prentice Hall, New York, 1974.

4.      N.G.R.Iyengar, Structural Stability of Plates and Shells (Ellis Horwood Series in Civil Engineering), East-West Press, New Delhi.

5.      G.J.Simitses, An Introduction to the Elastic Stability of Structures, Prentice Hall, New York, 1976.

6.      Z.P.Bazant and L.Cedolin, Stability of Structures: Elastic, Inelastic, Fracture and Damage theories, Oxford University Press, New York, 1991.

 

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CE 621 - Plastic Analysis

Yield condition and concepts of simple plastic collapse, idealisational collapse criteria, virtual work in the elastic-plastic state; Theorems of plastic collapse; Methods of analysis and design, Applications to planar and simple space structures; Deflection at collapse; Minimum weight analysis; Variable repeated loads; Combined stress problems; Introduction to stability.

References:

1.      J.F. Baker, M.R. Home and J. Heyman, Steel Skeleton, Vol.II, Cambridge Univ. Press, London, 1961.

2.      B.G. Neal, The Plastic Methods of Structural Analysis, Champman and Hall.

3.      P.G. Hodge (Jr.), Plastic Analysis of Structures, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1959.

4.      J. Heyman, Beams and Framed Structures, Pergamon Press, 1974.

5.      SP: 6(6)-1972, Applications of Plastic Theory in Design of Steel Structures, Indian Standards Institution, New Delhi, 1972.

6.      A. Mrazik, M. Skaloud and M. Tochacek, Plastic Design of Steel Structures, Ellis Horwood, Chichester, 1987.

 

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CE 615 - Structural Optimization

Formulation of different types of structural optimisation problems; Optimality criteria based structural optimisation; Computational of derivatives of response quantities with respect to design variables; Classical optimisation; Lagrange multiplier technique and Kuhn-Tucker conditions; Solution of NLP by direct methods and by series of unconstrained optimisation problems and by series of linear programming problems.

References:

1.      S.S.Rao, Optimisation, Theory and Applications, 2nd Edition, Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi, 1991.

2.      J.S.Arora, Introduction to Optimum Design, McGraw-Hill International Edition, New York, 1989.

3.      A.J.Morris (Editor), Foundations of Structural Optimisation - A Unified Approach; John Wiley and Sons, Chichester, 1982.

4.      G.V.Reklaitis, A.Ravindran and K.M.Ragsdell, Engineering Optimisation Methods and Applications, John Wiley, New York, 1983.

 

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CE 617 - Plates and Shells

Plate equation and behaviour of thin plates in cartesian, polar and skew coordinates; Curvilinear coordinates and coordinate transformation; Isotropic and orthotropic plates, bending and twisting of plates; Navier?s solution and Energy method, rectangular, circular plates and plates with variable rigidity in cartesian and polar coodinates; Numerical solutions. Shell behaviour, shell surfaces and characteristics, classifications of shells, equilibrium equations in curvilinear coordinates, force displacement relations; Membrane analysis of shells of revolution and cylindrical shells under different loads, shallow shells, concept of pseudo-stresses, membrane solution of elliptic paraboloids and hyperboloids, solutions of typical problems.

References:

5.      S. P. Timoshenko and S. W. Krieger, Theory of Plates and Shells, McGraw-Hill, 1959.

6.      R. Szilard, Theory and Analysis of Plates: Classical and Numerical Methods, Prentice Hall, New York, 1974.

7.      N. K. Bairagi, Shell Analysis, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 1990.

8.      V.V. Novozhilov, Thin Shells, Groringen Publications, Netherlands, 1959.

 

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CE 639 - Green Building Design

Buildings are like living organisms that contribute to the life in the cities. A well-designed building that uses natural materials, passive heating and cooling systems can not only make the life of its inhabitants healthier, but also contribute to preserving the environment and natural resources. This course aims to teach the fundamentals of sustainable and energy efficient building design, by focusing on Building envelopes Building materials and properties Building systems and operations (HVAC, lighting, water supply, sewage, garbage disposal, recycling and composting) Clean & renewable energy in buildings Rainwater harvesting Water and energy conservation Energy modeling and performance evaluation of buildings Smart buildings (Sensing and control systems) Net Zero buildings, Passive house standards Building Rating systems (LEED, BREEAM, IGBC etc)

References:

1.      Hong, Wen et. al., Building Energy Efficiency - Why Green Buildings Are Key to Asia`s Future. The Asia Business Council (2007)

2.      Yudelson, Jerry, Green Building A to Z: Understanding the Language of Green Building. New Society Publishers (June 2007).

3.      Mendler, Sandra F., Odell, William, Lazarus, Mary Ann, The HOK Guidebook to Sustainable Design Second Edition. Wiley (November 2005) ISBN 97804716961314.

4.      McDonough, William and Braungart, Michael, Cradle to Cradle. Farrar, Straus & Giroux (April 2002) ISBN 9780865475878

5.      Snell, Clarke and Callahan, Tim, Building Green: A Complete How-To Guide to Alternative Building Methods Earth Plaster, Straw Bale, Cordwood, Cob, Living Roofs. Lark Crafts(August 2009) ISBN 978-1600595349

6.      Keeler, Marian and Burke, Bill - Fundamentals of Integrated Design for Sustainable Building. Wiley (May 2009) ISBN 9780472935

7.      Hindrichs, Dirk U., Plusminus 20/40 Latitude: Sustainable Building Design in Tropical and Subtropical Regions. Axel Menges (October 2007) ISBN 9783930698837

8.      Kibert, Charles J., Sustainable Construction: Green Building Design and Delivery, III edition. Wiley (October 30, 2) ISBN 9780470904459

9.      McHarg, Ian L., Design with Nature, I edition. Wiley (February 1995) ISBN 9780471114604

10.   Mazria, Edward, The Passive Solar Energy Book. Rodale Press (1980) ASIN B000VNM20C

11.   Kwok, Alison and Grondzik, Walter, The Green Studio Handbook: Environmental Strategies for Schematic Design, II edition. Architectural Press (April 2011) ISBN 9780080890524

12.   Shurcliff, William A., Thermal Shutters & Shades - Over 100 Schemes for Reducing Heat Loss through Windows, 1st edition. Brick House Publishing Co (April 1981) ISBN 9780931790140 \

13.   Indian Green Building Council: www.igbc.inIGBC Green Homes Abridged Reference Guide

14.   IGBC Green Factory Building Abridged Reference Guide

15.   LEED India NC Reference Guide / LEED India CS Reference Guide

16.   Background material of green building training programme conducted by IGBC

17.   Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment: http://grihaindia.org/

18.   United States Green Building Council: http://www.usgbc.org/

19.   The Whole Building Design Guide: http://www.wbdg.org/Technical Manual,

20.   Australia home: http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/index.html

21.   United States Department of Energy: http://energy.gov/

 

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CEXXX – Structural Stability and Plastic Analysis

Concept of stability, static, dynamic and energy criteria; Buckling of columns, Lateral-torsional buckling of beams; Buckling of Plates and Stiffened Plates, Yield condition and Inelastic buckling; Buckling Snap through and post-buckling;

Concepts of simple plastic collapse, Theorems of plastic collapse; Collapse criteria, Methods of analysis and design, Applications to planar and simple space structure;

References:

1.      S.P. Timoshenkoand J.M.Gere, Theory of Elastic Stability, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill New York, 1961.

2.      A.Chajes, Principles of Structural Stability Theory, Prentice Hall, New York, 1974.

3.      G.J. Simitses, An Introduction to the Elastic Stability of Structures, Prentice Hall, New York, 1976.

4.      Z.P. Bazant and L. Cedolin, Stability of Structures: Elastic, Inelastic, Fracture and Damage theories, Oxford University Press, New York, 1991.

5.      B.G. Neal, The Plastic Methods of Structural Analysis, Champman and Hall 1959.

6.      A. Mrazik, M. Skaloud and M. Tochacek, Plastic Design of Steel Structures, Ellis Horwood, Chichester, 1987.

 

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CE-5: Dual Degree in Ocean Engineering

Course structure – Fourth year

Fourth year – 1st Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 401

Water Resources Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 463

Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 465

Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 407

Foundation Engineering

 3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective I

6

Departmental UG Electives

CE 680

Mechanics of Water Waves

6

PG Core

CE 769

Coastal and Ocean Environment

6

PG Core

Total Credits

42

 

 

Fourth year – 2nd Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 707

Coastal, Port and Harbor Engineering

6

PG Core

CE 708

Offshore Engineering

6

PG Core

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective II

6

Departmental UG Electives

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective III

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective IV

6

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective V

6

CE 694

Credit Seminar

4

Seminar

Total Credits

40

 

 


 

CE 680 - Mechanics of Water Waves

Introduction to wave phenomena. Wave classification, measurement, generation, forecasting. Wave theories:  linear, non-linear. Wave spectrum: basic concepts, analysis and derivation. Statistical analysis of waves: short and long term. Propagation in shallow water-refraction, diffraction, reflection, breaking, current effects. Wave effects like, run-up, overtopping and transmission. Littoral transport under wave action.

References:

1.      T. Sarpkaya and M. Issacsson, Mechanics of Wave Induced Forces on Offshore Structures, Van Nostrand Reinhold, London, UK, 1981.

2.      Shore Protection Manual, U S Army Corps of Engineers, CERC, Washington, D.C., USA, 1984.

3.      R. L. Wiegel, Oceanographical Engineering, Prentice Hall, New Jersey.

 

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CE 769 - Coastal and Ocean Environment

Sea bed morphology; Wave mechanics - generation, forecasting, wave theories, shoaling, refraction, diffraction, breaking; Tidal propagation in estuaries; Coastal currents; Littoral processes; Sediment transport; Shore protection measures; Planning and operation of harbor, coastal and offshore structures.

References:

1.      Gaythwaite, J., The Marine Environment and Structural Design, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1981.

2.      Herbich, J.B., Handbook of Coastal and Ocean Engineering, Gulf publishing Co., 1990.

3.      Shore Protection Manual, US Army Coastal Engineering Research Centre, Vicksberg, USA. 1984.

4.      Gerwick, B.C., Construction of Offshore Structures, Wiley, New York, 1986.

 

 

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CE 707 - Coastal, Port and Harbor Engineering

Coastal protection works, Port and harbors - planning, design and construction aspects; harbor layout, model studies: physical and numerical breakwaters, wharf, jetty, mooring and dolphins, dry docks, shipyards, dredging, CRZ and guidelines, navigation, shipping: ship stability (static and dynamic); submarine pipelines: forces, laying, stresses, buckling; equipment.

References:

1.      Coastal Engineering Manual (CEM). 2011. US Army Coastal Engineering Research Centre,Vicksburg, USA.

2.      Robert M. Sorenen. 2006. Basic coastal engineering, Springer, USA.

3.      John W. Gaythwaite. 2004. Design of Marine Facilities for the Berthing, Mooring, and Repair of Vessels, Amer Society of Civil Engineers.

4.      John B. Herbich and Charles L. Bretschneider.1992. Handbook of Coastal and Ocean Engineering, Gulf publishing Company.

5.      Per Brunn. 1989. Port engineering, Vol. 1, 2 and 3, Gulf Publishing Company.

 

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CE 708 - Offshore Engineering

Types of offshore structures, planning and design aspects, wave loads ?? regular and random, loads due to wind, tides and currents. Operational environment, equipments, materials and corrosion, repairs and maintenance, installation, common operations.

References:

1.      Subrata K. Chakrabarti. 2003. Hydrodynamics offshore structures, WIT press.

2.      Yashimi Goda. 2010. Random seas and design of marine structures, World Scientific.

3.      Tugut S. Sarpkaya. 2010. Wave Forces on Offshore Structures, Cambridge University Press.

4.      Ben C. Gerwick. 2000. Construction of marine and offshore structures, CRC Press.

5.      Minoo H. Patel. 1989. Dynamics of offshore structures, Buttersworth.

 

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Course structure – Fifth year

Fifth year – 1st semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 706

Ocean Engineering Laboratory

4

PG Laboratory course

CE xxx

PG Elective I

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

PG Elective II

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

DDP-I

36

 

Total Credits

52

 

 

Fifth year – 2nd semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 687

Offshore Construction

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

PG Elective III

6

PG Elective

CE xxx

DDP-II

36

 

Total Credits

48

 

 

List of CE-5 PG Electives

Code

Course Name

Semester Offered

CE 607

Numerical Techniques in Hydraulic Engg

II

CE 608

Eco-hydro-climatology

I

CE 701

Remote Sensing Technology

I

CE 710

Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems in Water Resources Management

II

CE 731

Mechanics of Fluid Flow

I

GNR-630

Introduction to Geospatial Technologies

I

 

 

 

CE 706 - Ocean Engineering Laboratory

Wave flume experiments to study propagation, refraction, reflection, diffraction, wave forces. Hydraulic modeling for ports, harbours. Numerical modeling of waves, tides, currents, fluid-structure interaction.

References:

1.      Steven A. Hughes. 1995. Physical models and laboratory techniques in coastal engineering, Advanced series on Ocean Engineering-Vol. 7,World Scientific, Singapore.

2.      Robert A. Darlymple. 1985. Physical modelling incoastal engineering, A.A.Balkema, Rotterdam,Netherlands.

3.      Charles L. Mader. 2004. Numerical modeling ofwater waves, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida.

4.      Subrata K. Chakrabarti. 1994. Offshore StructureModeling, Advanced Series on Ocean Engineering-Vol. 9, World Scientific.

 

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CE 687 - Offshore Construction

Offshore environment: operational aspects of waves, currents, tides, wind. Structural material: types and properties of steel, concrete and synthetics. Construction equipments:  specialized barges and OSVs. Common operations: surveying, diving, crew transfer, etc. Installation: Pile supported, gravity and complaint structures. Repair and maintenance:  structures and pipelines. Rehabilitation: strengthening and salvage. Specialized constructions: OTEC, wave power devices, channel, etc.

References:

1.      B. C. Gerwick, Construction of Offshore Structures, John Wiley and Sons, London, UK, 2000.

2.      J. B. Herbich, Handbook of Coastal and Ocean Engineering, Gulf Pub., Houston, USA, 1990.

3.      B. McClleland and M. D. Reifel, Planning and Design of Fixed Offshore Platforms, Van Nostrnad Reinhold, London, UK, 1986.

 

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GNR 630 -  Introduction to Geospatial Technologies

 

References:

 

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CE-6: Dual Degree in Remote Sensing

Course structure – Fourth Year

Fourth Year – 1st Semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks

Core/

Departmental Elective/

Institute Elective

L

T

P

CE 401

Water Resources Engineering

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 463

Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineers

3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 465

Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

2

1

0

6

Core Course

CE 407

Foundation Engineering

 3

0

0

6

Core Course

CE 4xx

Departmental UG Elective I

6

Departmental UG Electives

CE 705

Photogrammetric Engineering

6

            PG Core

CE 701

Remote sensing Technology

6

PG Core

Total Credits

42

 

 

Fourth year – 2nd semester

Course Code

Course Name

Credit Structure

Credits

Remarks